The IRT model underlying ASVAB scoring is the three-parameter logistic (3PL) model. The 3PL model represents the probability that an examinee at a given level of ability will respond correctly to an individual item with given characteristics. Specifically, the item characteristics represented in the 3PL model are difficulty, discrimination (i.e., how well the item discriminates among examinees of differing levels of ability), and guessing (i.e., the likelihood that a very low ability examinee would respond correctly simply by guessing).
The ASVAB test can be taken at your school or a MEPS (Military Entrance Processing Stations) or MET (Mobile Examination Test) sites.  When the ASVAB is administered at your school, it is usually part of the Student Testing Program or Career Exploration Program.  When the ASVAB is given at MEPS or MET sites, it is part of the Enlistment Testing Program.  The ASVAB test content is the same no matter where you take it, except that you will not have to take the Assembling Objects test if you take the test at your school (as part of the Student Testing Program).  When you take the test in the Student Testing Program you will receive three composite scores (Verbal Skills, Math Skills, and Science and Technical Skills).  When you take the ASVAB as part of the Enlistment Testing Program, you will receive an AFQT (Armed Forces Qualification Test) score and Service composite scores.  These scores are used for assigning your military job.

The ASVAB was created in 1968. By 1976, all branches of the military began using this test. In 2002, the test underwent many revisions, but its main goal of gauging a person’s basic skills remained the same. Today, there is a computerized version of the test as well as a written version. The Department of Defense developed this test and it’s taken by students in thousands of schools across the country. It is also given at Military Entrance Processing Stations (MEPS).
In order to take the ASVAB at a MEPS for enlistment purposes, an individual will need to speak with a recruiter and schedule a time to take the test. ASVAB testing at a MEPS is self-paced and taken on a computer, and it may be retaken after a one-month waiting period.  Entitled the CAT-ASVAB, the test is adaptive – meaning it adapts to your ability level.
The Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB) is a comprehensive test that helps determine students’ eligibility and suitability for careers in the military. Students who score in the 31st percentile are eligible for a wide variety of careers (combined with standards such as physical condition and personal conduct). Students and schools are also encouraged to take advantage of a free career exploration program that links personal interests with demonstrated aptitudes from the 9 ASVAB subtests, half of which relate to vocational skills, in addition to math and verbal skills.
Test scores provide only one measure of your skills and abilities.  Test scores and grades, combined with information about your interests, values, skills, and achievements may help you select appropriate occupations for career exploration.  As you explore careers, you can compare your skills with the skill requirements of occupations in which you are interested.
The test is part of the larger ASVAB Career Exploration Program. The Program uses the test to help students identify both their interests as well as their strengths in three skills areas (verbal, math, and science and technical skills). Based on a student's skill levels, information is provided about more than 400 occupations in order to enable students and parents to judge their potential success in areas that interest them the most. Schools that may be facing budget cuts or finding themselves with limited resources devoted to career counseling are encouraged to find out whether using the ASVAB Program would be useful, as the testing and career development services are free of charge.
The IRT model underlying ASVAB scoring is the three-parameter logistic (3PL) model. The 3PL model represents the probability that an examinee at a given level of ability will respond correctly to an individual item with given characteristics. Specifically, the item characteristics represented in the 3PL model are difficulty, discrimination (i.e., how well the item discriminates among examinees of differing levels of ability), and guessing (i.e., the likelihood that a very low ability examinee would respond correctly simply by guessing).

Note: While the U.S. Navy is older than the Marine Corps,[52] the Marine Corps takes precedence due to previous inconsistencies in the Navy's birth date. The Marine Corps has recognized its observed birth date on a more consistent basis. The Second Continental Congress is considered to have established the Navy on 13 October 1775 by authorizing the purchase of ships, but did not actually pass the "Rules for the Regulation of the Navy of the United Colonies" until 27 November 1775.[53] The Marine Corps was established by act of said Congress on 10 November 1775. The Navy did not officially recognize 13 October 1775 as its birth date until 1972, when then–Chief of Naval Operations Admiral Elmo Zumwalt authorized it to be observed as such.[52]

Our comprehensive study guide for the AFQT is written by our AFQT experts, who painstakingly researched the topics and the concepts that you need to know to ace your AFQT. Our original research into the Armed Forces Qualification Test (AFQT), offered by the Department of Defense (DOD), reveals the specific content areas and the essential skills that are critical for you to know on the AFQT. We've taken the information and developed a study guide that is guaranteed to help you be successful on the AFQT.
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In Medieval Europe, tales of knighthood and chivalry, the officer class of the period captured the popular imagination. Writers and poets like Taliesin, Chrétien de Troyes and Thomas Malory wrote tales of derring-do, featuring Arthur, Guinevere, Lancelot and Galahad. Even in the 21st century, books and films about the Arthurian legend and the Holy Grail continue to appear.
Our full, multiple-choice ASVAB practice tests help you evaluate your understanding of essential test concepts. With these practice tests, you can test your knowledge of different exam sections, such as General Science, Arithmetic Reasoning, Word Knowledge and Paragraph Comprehension. We'll show you which answers you get correct and which subjects you've mastered. These practice tests also identify the questions you get wrong, so you can go back to specific course lessons and review the material further. These convenient ASVAB practice tests will help you understand what you know well, what you still need to study and how prepared you are overall.
The Air Force ASVAB scores are frequently a subject of confusion and anxiety for the person planning a career in the Air Force. The real meaning of ASVAB scores as they apply to each person's future in this branch of the military is rarely explained fully . There are some unfortunate misapprehensions about what the scores mean and how they affect a person's occupational prospects in the Air Force.
Sergeant Leigh Ann Hester became the first woman to receive the Silver Star, the third-highest U.S. decoration for valor, for direct participation in combat. In Afghanistan, Monica Lin Brown was presented the Silver Star for shielding wounded soldiers with her body.[45] In March 2012, the U.S. military had two women, Ann E. Dunwoody and Janet C. Wolfenbarger, with the rank of four-star general.[46][47] In 2016, Air Force General Lori Robinson became the first female officer to command a major Unified Combatant Command (USNORTHCOM) in the history of the United States Armed Forces.[48]
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