Each of the five services employs a single Senior Enlisted Advisor at departmental level. This individual is the highest ranking enlisted member within that respective service and functions as the chief advisor to the service secretary, service chief and Congress on matters concerning the enlisted force. These individuals carry responsibilities and protocol requirements equivalent to three-star general or flag officers. They are as follows:

This study guide offers in-depth preparation for all areas of the Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB). Each lesson comes with a fun, informative video to help you get up to speed on the same subjects the ASVAB will test you on. As you review each lesson, try the accompanying self-assessment quizzes to reinforce your understanding of the material. You can also access the course at any time using your computer or mobile device.


Law prohibits applicants in Category V from enlisting.[6] In addition, there are constraints placed on Category IV recruits; recruits in Category IV must be high school diploma graduates but cannot be denied enlistment solely on this criteria if the recruit is needed to satisfy established strength requirements. Furthermore, the law constrains the percentage of accessions who can fall between Categories IV-V (currently, the limit is 20% of all persons originally enlisted in a given armed force in a given fiscal year).[6]
It is critical to know how ASVAB scores are calculated and what they are used for.  The Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB) tests are used to identify whether a candidate is qualified to enlist in a particular branch of the U.S. Military.  The ASVAB test is also used to determine which military jobs (referred to as MOS for Military Occupational Specialties) a candidate is best suited for.  ASVAB scores can also be used by test takers to help explore which careers they may be a good fit for them – whether they go into the military or not. While no one officially passes or fails the ASVAB, each branch of the military has specific minimum scores required for enlistment.  Your scores also affect the type of military job, enlistment bonuses and salary you are eligible for.
When you are considered a career in the military you need to take the ASVAB test. But each branch of the military has different ASVAB requirements that you need to meet. They are different levels of education that you must reach to take the test. But you also need to score a certain amount of points on that ASVAB test to gain access into the branch you desire.

The Ultimate ASVAB Practice Pack provides you three full-length ASVAB practice tests with answer key and unlimited access to the ASVAB Online Practice Center. Modeled After the CAT-ASVAB with over 2000 questions in the question pool – each practice test is different every time you take it. See your AFQT score and Subtest scores at the end of each practice test. Track your scores and history online to monitor your progress and watch your scores increase! 100% Satisfaction Guaranteed.
The four most important sections of the test—Word Knowledge, Paragraph Comprehension, Arithmetic Reasoning, and Mathematics Knowledge-make up your Armed Forces Qualifications Test (AFQT) score. Your AFQT score ranges from 0 to 100 and determines if you are able to enlist in the military and which jobs and programs you may qualify for when you are in.
If you didn't earn a score that was high enough to be accepted to your chosen branch of the military, or if you didn't earn a line score high enough to qualify for a desired career option, then you may retake the ASVAB. You must wait a full month before you can take the ASVAB a second time. If you wish to take the test a third time, you must wait another month from the date of your second attempt. After the third attempt, there is a waiting period of 6 months before you can take the test again.

The scores from the other tests are used to determine what type of specialty you might be best suited for.  These "composite" scores (also known as line scores, MOS scores, or aptitude area scores) are calculated by adding together combinations of the different sub test standard scores. These composite scores are then used to determine which different military jobs (aka Military Occupational Specialties or MOS) may be the best fit for you.  Each branch of the military will have their own approach to these composite scores.


The four most important sections of the test—Word Knowledge, Paragraph Comprehension, Arithmetic Reasoning, and Mathematics Knowledge-make up your Armed Forces Qualifications Test (AFQT) score. Your AFQT score ranges from 0 to 100 and determines if you are able to enlist in the military and which jobs and programs you may qualify for when you are in.
Retesting is possible depending on a variety of circumstances. It is possible to retake the ASVAB or PiCAT, but you will need to coordinate this with your recruiting office. In general you may be required to wait a month or more to retake the test; each branch of the service may have different requirements that must be fulfilled in order to retest.
There is another ASVAB score that's equally important, if not more so, because it is the score that determines if a person is eligible for military service. It's the Armed Forces Qualification Test score, or AFQT score. This score is calculated from only four of the nine Standard Scores on the ASVAB - Arithmetic Reasoning (AR), Mathematics Knowledge (MK), Paragraph Comprehension (PC), and Word Knowledge (WK). First, the WK and PC scores are added together, then the sum is doubled. This is known as the Verbal Expression (VE) score. The VE, MK, and AR scores are then added together, and the sum is the AFQT. This score is a straight percentile measure, expressed as a number from 1-99. The number is the percentage of people who scored lower than the test taker. For example, if a person receives an AFQT score of 63, that means that he did better on the test than 63% of the people who have taken it.

Again, we must stress that there is no passing or failing score on the exam. The test is a measure of aptitude and provides percentile rankings to indicate your performance compared to other test takers. However, different branches of the military do have minimum score requirements for enlistment. This means that it’s important to make sure you’re prepared for test day, and that’s where a practice test will prove valuable.
To be admitted to the ASVAB testing room you will need to show a valid id. It is also important to be on time (or early!) since you will be turned away if you show up after the scheduled start time. The ASVAB can be given via computer or pencil and paper.  If you are testing at a MEPS site you will take it on a computer.  The pencil and paper version is given at most MET sites.  The computer version of the test is given as a "computer adaptive test" (CAT) which means that the test will adapt based on the level of the individual test taker (e.g., if you answer many questions correctly, you may be shown fewer questions).

The ASVAB test can be taken at your school or a MEPS (Military Entrance Processing Stations) or MET (Mobile Examination Test) sites.  When the ASVAB is administered at your school, it is usually part of the Student Testing Program or Career Exploration Program.  When the ASVAB is given at MEPS or MET sites, it is part of the Enlistment Testing Program.  The ASVAB test content is the same no matter where you take it, except that you will not have to take the Assembling Objects test if you take the test at your school (as part of the Student Testing Program).  When you take the test in the Student Testing Program you will receive three composite scores (Verbal Skills, Math Skills, and Science and Technical Skills).  When you take the ASVAB as part of the Enlistment Testing Program, you will receive an AFQT (Armed Forces Qualification Test) score and Service composite scores.  These scores are used for assigning your military job.
One of the oldest military publications is The Art of War, by the Chinese philosopher Sun Tzu.[34] Written in the 6th century BCE, the 13-chapter book is intended as military instruction, and not as military theory, but has had a huge influence on Asian military doctrine, and from the late 19th century, on European and United States military planning. It has even been used to formulate business tactics, and can even be applied in social and political areas.[where?]
Armed Forces & Society (AFS) a quarterly publication with international scope publishes articles on civil-military relations, veterans, force effectiveness and diversity, military culture, officer education and training, military institutions, ethics, unit cohesion, military families, peacemaking, privatization, public opinion and conflict management. The editors and contributors include political scientist, sociologist, psychologists, legal scholars, historians and economists as well as specialists in military organization and strategy, and peacekeeping.
Individuals can also complete a computer version of the test. This is an adaptive test, meaning the difficulty level of each question is determined based on whether the previous question was answered correctly or incorrectly. Aside from the fact that this version of the AFQT is a computer adaptive test, the number of questions that must be answered varies from the written version of the assessment. Individuals only need to answer a total of 59 questions. 89 minutes is allotted for the four sections of the Armed Forces Qualification Test, and test-takers typically have more than enough time to complete each section.
A lot of people see the “CAT” term attached to the ASVAB test when they first start looking into the test and aren’t sure what that stands for. This term is an acronym and it stands for “Computerized Adaptive Test”. There are three different versions of the ASVAB test. The CAT is available at military processing stations for enlisting soldiers. The pencil and paper (also known as the P&P or S-ASVAB) version of the test is available for high school and college students who may not actually enlist. The third type of ASVAB test is the MET-ASVAB, or Mobile Examination Test, which is available only for enlisted soldiers at mobile testing centers (this test is also done with paper and pencil).
If you are pressed for time, it may be worthwhile to look into future ASVAB test dates in order to plan ahead in case you get a poor score on your upcoming ASVAB test. You can check with your high school counselor or your military recruiter to make sure that you will be eligible to take future tests along with your planned upcoming test date in the event that you get a bad ASVAB score.
The ASVAB is routinely reviewed to eliminate any potential biases from questions and scoring. The exam underwent a major revision in 2002. Two years later, a renormalization of the percentile scoring system was performed to ensure that a 50 percent score represented performing better than 50 percent of all test takers. The 10-section ASVAB improves the matching of volunteers with available jobs and helps match job openings with qualified individuals.
Again, the ASVAB is a wide-ranging exam covering many different areas. The designers of ASVAB practice tests, at least the high quality ones, know this and have spent time researching past tests to come up with practice tests that feature questions covering areas commonly tested for on the real exam. Thus, taking practice tests is a great way to focus on the material that matters most and avoid wasting your time studying content that likely won’t be on the test.
In addition to the MGIB, there may be additional funds available from the College Fund and Veterans' Educational Assistance Program (VEAP) "kicker". If you are receiving Tuition Assistance (TA) from your branch of service, you may be eligible to use MGIB to supplement or "top up" your tuition assistance. Benefits end 10 years from the date of your last discharge or release from active duty. You may be able to transfer your MGIB entitlement to basic educational assistance to one or more of your dependents, including your spouse and/or children. To apply, file VA Form 22-1990, Application for Education Benefits. For more information, call 1-888-GIBILL-1 (1-888-442-4551) or visit the GI Bill Education Benefits web site.
The Armed Forces Qualification Test (AFQT) is used by all of the Services to determine if an applicant is eligible for the military. Four of the ASVAB subtests are combined to form the AFQT. It measures general cognitive ability and is composed of verbal and mathematics subtests. AFQT scores are grouped into categories for reporting purposes. The table below shows the AFQT categories and the percentile score ranges corresponding to the categories. Applicants that score in AFQT category IIIA or higher may qualify for enlistment incentives.
It’s best to keep the contact information of your nearest recruiting office or your actual recruiter; they are your best bet for getting your scores. ASVAB scores are valid for up to two years before you need to retest so most offices will send your current scores via mail. If you can’t get yours by mail, you can pick them up from your local recruiting office.
This is a solid album (that's what they were called when I originally bought this) that I'd forgotten about until I heard the live version of Goon Squad playing at a BBQ, reminding me how much I liked the song and all the other songs on this release. Well, that meant that I needed to purchase the digital version so that Armed Forces could be added to my summer music rotation. One day I might actually get around to digitizing my vinyl collection, in the meantime I'll be listening to Elvis.
NOVEMBER 9, 2018 – The U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA) is celebrating the accomplishments of veteran, service member and military spouse small business owners nationwide during National Veterans Small Business Week (NVSBW), Nov. 5-9. SBA offers a Boots to Business (B2B) entrepreneurship training program as one of the Department of Defense’s (DoD) Transition Assistance Program […]
The test must be completed if you wish to serve in the Army, Navy, Marines, Air Force, or Coast Guard. The test can also be taken as a career-exploration tool if you are a high school sophomore, junior, or senior. It takes approximately three hours to complete. If you take the computerized version of the test, results are given immediately. If you complete a paper and pencil test, you’ll get results within two weeks.
The next requirement comes as a fairly basic need for the military to identify possible threats it may be called upon to face. For this purpose, some of the commanding forces and other military, as well as often civilian personnel participate in identification of these threats. This is at once an organisation, a system and a process collectively called military intelligence (MI).

Under current Department of Defense regulation, the various components of the U.S. Armed Forces have a set order of seniority. Examples of the use of this system include the display of service flags, placement of Soldiers, Marines, Sailors, Airmen and Coast Guardsmen in formation, etc. When the Coast Guard shall operate as part of the Department of the Navy, United States Coast Guard Academy cadets, the United States Coast Guard and the Coast Guard Reserve shall take precedence after United States Naval Academy midshipmen; the United States Navy; and Navy Reserve, respectively.[51]


First, the ASVAB measures your accumulated knowledge in different areas. So if you are currently in school, stay focused and study hard. Your overall knowledge gained in school will most likely be reflected in your ASVAB score. Second, though accumulated knowledge is important, you may be able to raise your score by preparing specifically for the ASVAB, especially in areas where you are weak. Various study guides are available for this purpose (listed left).

This is a private website that is not affiliated with the U.S. government, U.S. Armed Forces, or Department of Veterans Affairs. U.S. government agencies have not reviewed this information. This site is not connected with any government agency. If you would like to find more information about benefits offered by the U.S. Department of Veteran’s Affairs, please visit the official U.S. government web site for veterans benefits at http://www.va.gov.


The AFQT score is a percentile ranking between 1 and 99 that shows where your score is placed in relation to others. For example, if you score a 54 on the AFQT, this means that you scored as well as or better than 54% of other recruits. If you are not satisfied with your score and wish to retake the test to improve your chances at getting selected, you must wait a month before taking it again. You can retake the test as many times as you want, but after 3 attempts the waiting period jumps to 6 months.
The Armed Forces Qualification Test (AFQT) is used by all of the Services to determine if an applicant is eligible for the military. Four of the ASVAB subtests are combined to form the AFQT. It measures general cognitive ability and is composed of verbal and mathematics subtests. AFQT scores are grouped into categories for reporting purposes. The table below shows the AFQT categories and the percentile score ranges corresponding to the categories. Applicants that score in AFQT category IIIA or higher may qualify for enlistment incentives.
There are essentially two options when it comes to preparing for this test. First, a person can attempt to reassess all of the information that they learned over a decade by spending hours compiling information. Secondly, a person can find a specially formatted ASVAB practice test that covers all areas of both the written test and computerized test. Clearly, the best choice is the ASVAB practice test. The question becomes “Where does one find an accurate ASVAB practice test?”
×