Limited Duty Officer: due to the highly technical nature of some officer billets, the Marine Corps, Navy and Coast Guard employ a system of promoting proven senior enlisted members to the ranks of commissioned officers. They fill a need that is similar to, but distinct from that filled by warrant officers (to the point where their accession is through the same school). While warrant officers remain technical experts, LDOs take on the role of a generalist, like that of officers commissioned through more traditional sources. LDOs are limited, not by their authority, but by the types of billets they are allowed to fill. However, in recent times they have come to be used more and more like their more-traditional counterparts.
This course is designed to help you dust the cobwebs off information you may have learned long ago or boost your scores if you have already taken the test (or a sample test administered by a recruiter) and did not meet the score you needed for the occupation you desire. This review is particularly helpful if you have been out of school for some time, did not graduate a standard high school program, or either did not take or performed poorly in classes related certain subject areas (e.g. shop or automotive classes). Within each subject area, the lessons build on one another, so we will help you progress in a logical manner in bite-sized, 10-minute-or-less chunks. Skip to the lessons that you know you need to focus on, and even jump to specific portions of the videos using the video tags. Use the quizzes, chapter tests, and course exam to see how you're doing and refocus your studies as necessary.
The AFQT score is a percentile ranking between 1 and 99 that shows where your score is placed in relation to others. For example, if you score a 54 on the AFQT, this means that you scored as well as or better than 54% of other recruits. If you are not satisfied with your score and wish to retake the test to improve your chances at getting selected, you must wait a month before taking it again. You can retake the test as many times as you want, but after 3 attempts the waiting period jumps to 6 months.
The Army, Navy, Air Force and Marine Corps each provide tuition assistance (a "kicker") in addition to what you earn through the Montgomery GI Bill. Each service controls the amount of extra money it provides. The Army fund increases the amount of support to as much as $70,000, the Navy fund increases the amount of support to as much as $50,000 and the Marine Corps fund increases the amount of support to as much as $30,000. College Funds are awarded on a competitive basis according to academic merit (i.e., scoring in the top half of the Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery). To qualify one must also agree to serve six years.
First, the ASVAB measures your accumulated knowledge in different areas. So if you are currently in school, stay focused and study hard. Your overall knowledge gained in school will most likely be reflected in your ASVAB score. Second, though accumulated knowledge is important, you may be able to raise your score by preparing specifically for the ASVAB, especially in areas where you are weak. Various study guides are available for this purpose (listed left).
The ASVAB test can be taken at your school or a MEPS (Military Entrance Processing Stations) or MET (Mobile Examination Test) sites.  When the ASVAB is administered at your school, it is usually part of the Student Testing Program or Career Exploration Program.  When the ASVAB is given at MEPS or MET sites, it is part of the Enlistment Testing Program.  The ASVAB test content is the same no matter where you take it, except that you will not have to take the Assembling Objects test if you take the test at your school (as part of the Student Testing Program).  When you take the test in the Student Testing Program you will receive three composite scores (Verbal Skills, Math Skills, and Science and Technical Skills).  When you take the ASVAB as part of the Enlistment Testing Program, you will receive an AFQT (Armed Forces Qualification Test) score and Service composite scores.  These scores are used for assigning your military job.

Law prohibits applicants in Category V from enlisting.[6] In addition, there are constraints placed on Category IV recruits; recruits in Category IV must be high school diploma graduates but cannot be denied enlistment solely on this criteria if the recruit is needed to satisfy established strength requirements. Furthermore, the law constrains the percentage of accessions who can fall between Categories IV-V (currently, the limit is 20% of all persons originally enlisted in a given armed force in a given fiscal year).[6]
The ASVAB test can be taken at your school or a MEPS (Military Entrance Processing Stations) or MET (Mobile Examination Test) sites.  When the ASVAB is administered at your school, it is usually part of the Student Testing Program or Career Exploration Program.  When the ASVAB is given at MEPS or MET sites, it is part of the Enlistment Testing Program.  The ASVAB test content is the same no matter where you take it, except that you will not have to take the Assembling Objects test if you take the test at your school (as part of the Student Testing Program).  When you take the test in the Student Testing Program you will receive three composite scores (Verbal Skills, Math Skills, and Science and Technical Skills).  When you take the ASVAB as part of the Enlistment Testing Program, you will receive an AFQT (Armed Forces Qualification Test) score and Service composite scores.  These scores are used for assigning your military job.
Battlefield commission: under certain conditions, enlisted personnel who have skills that separate them from their peers can become officers by direct commissioning of a commander so authorized to grant them. This type of commission is rarely granted and is reserved only for the most exceptional enlisted personnel; it is done on an ad hoc basis, typically only in wartime. No direct battlefield commissions have been awarded since the Vietnam War. The Navy and Air Force do not employ this commissioning path.

Mathematics Knowledge tests the ability to solve problems by applying knowledge of mathematical concepts and applications. The problems focus on concepts and algorithms, and involve number theory, numeration, algebraic operations and equations, geometry, measurement and probability. Mathematics Knowledge is one factor that characterizes mathematics comprehension; it also assesses logical thinking.
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