The SAT requires training of the mind. More specifically it requires one to be able to pick up on context clues, make valid assumptions, and express concrete facts. This is why millions of students study intensely before they jump right into the test. Imagine if another area was added onto that same test. The person studying for that test would then need to study even harder. That is the logic that should be put forth when preparing for the ASVAB. It requires that a person expresses the previously mentioned skills while adding the verbal/physical aspects. The question becomes “How does one prepare themselves for this rigorous test?”
The majority of people who complete the exam have little intention of entering the military. However, it’s important to keep in mind that the United States military is actually one of the nation’s largest employers. If you’re undecided about your future after high school graduation, taking the test can give you a better picture of your options in both civilian and military life.
Unlock extra vacation savings by upgrading to Premium membership. Premium members save 10% Off High Demand vacations, $50 Off Resort Vacation Certificates and 10% Off Short Stays. They also have access to exclusive benefits such as Savings on City Attractions Early Sale Access, Last-Minute Vacations starting at $309 per week, and 25 Reward Dollars every month.
SOC is a consortium of more than 1550 colleges and universities that provide educational opportunities for servicemembers and their families. It is co-sponsored by the American Association of State Colleges and Universities (AASCU) and the American Association of Community Colleges (AACC) and managed for the DoD by the Defense Activity for Non-Traditional Education Support (DANTES). Course work can be done on campus, at military installations and armories, and at a distance by computer or correspondence. Associate, bachelor, and graduate-level degree programs are available. Special curriculum areas include SOCAD (Army), SOCNAV (Navy), SOCMAR (Marines), and SOCGuard (Army National Guard). In addition, SOC operates ConAP (Concurrent Admissions Program) to increase college enrollment of Army enlistees (Army and Army Reserves). ConAP allows you to enlist in the Army at the same time as you apply for college. DANTES also operates its own Distance Learning Program. For more information, contact:
Note: While the U.S. Navy is older than the Marine Corps,[52] the Marine Corps takes precedence due to previous inconsistencies in the Navy's birth date. The Marine Corps has recognized its observed birth date on a more consistent basis. The Second Continental Congress is considered to have established the Navy on 13 October 1775 by authorizing the purchase of ships, but did not actually pass the "Rules for the Regulation of the Navy of the United Colonies" until 27 November 1775.[53] The Marine Corps was established by act of said Congress on 10 November 1775. The Navy did not officially recognize 13 October 1775 as its birth date until 1972, when then–Chief of Naval Operations Admiral Elmo Zumwalt authorized it to be observed as such.[52]
If school district or open-enrollment charter school has entered into a prior contract under which a vocational aptitude test that does not comply with the requirements for an alternative test outlined above, then the school district, open-enrollment charter school, or high school may elect not to provide the ASVAB for the term of the contract. On the expiration of the contract term, the requirements outlined in this letter become applicable to the school district, open-enrollment charter school or high school.
In Medieval Europe, tales of knighthood and chivalry, the officer class of the period captured the popular imagination. Writers and poets like Taliesin, Chrétien de Troyes and Thomas Malory wrote tales of derring-do, featuring Arthur, Guinevere, Lancelot and Galahad. Even in the 21st century, books and films about the Arthurian legend and the Holy Grail continue to appear.

 Taxes are additional. All prices are in U.S. dollars. Regular Space Available price is $369 USD per week when booked through the call center, and $349 USD per week when booked online. Free membership is based on eligibility. Destinations and travel times are subject to availability and confirmed on a first come, first served basis. Offer includes only accommodations and specifically excludes travel costs and other expenses that may be incurred. For additional terms and conditions, click here or call your Armed Forces Vacation Club® guide at 1-800-724-9988. Promotional discounts may not apply to all properties. Offer may not be combined with any other promotion, discount or coupon. Other restrictions may apply. Offer void where prohibited by law. No official U.S. Army endorsement is implied. Not paid for in whole or in part by any element of the U.S. Government, Military Service, or DoD Non Appropriated Fund Instrumentality (NAFI).
Anyone who is planning to enlist in the United States Armed Forces should be familiar with the military’s standards and screening processes. An important part of this screening process is the Armed Forces Qualification Test (AFQT), which is a subsection of the Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB). This standardized assessment measures a candidate’s skills in the areas of paragraph comprehension, word knowledge, arithmetic reasoning, and mathematics knowledge.
Our completely free ASVAB practice tests are the perfect way to brush up your skills. Take one of our many ASVAB practice tests for a run-through of commonly asked questions. You will receive incredibly detailed scoring results at the end of your ASVAB practice test to help you identify your strengths and weaknesses. Pick one of our ASVAB practice tests now and begin!
The United States Armed Forces[8] are the military forces of the United States of America. It consists of the Army, Marine Corps, Navy, Air Force, and Coast Guard.[9] The President of the United States is the Commander-in-Chief of the U.S. Armed Forces and forms military policy with the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) and U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS), both federal executive departments, acting as the principal organs by which military policy is carried out. All five armed services are among the seven uniformed services of the United States.[10]
A military recruiter determines if the candidate is a possible recruit. A recruiter will ask about marital status, health, education, drug use, and arrest record. It is important for the candidate to be upfront and truthful when answering questions. Once the recruiter has determined the individual is qualified for additional processing, the ASVAB is scheduled. A physical examination may also be conducted at the time of the test. 

Extra back-to-basics practice that has helped thousands of recruits to qualify for the armed forces. Thousands of military recruits need extra help to pass the ASVAB, or Armed Forces Test and here’s where they can find it! ARCO’s ASVAB Basics offers intensive practice in reading, vocabulary, and mathematics the subjects covered in the four ASVAB subtests that determine whether a recruit qualifies for enlistment. Now updated, it features: * Full-length ASVAB subtests for practice * Drills to improve basic academic skills * Complete explanatory answers.
Our full, multiple-choice ASVAB practice tests help you evaluate your understanding of essential test concepts. With these practice tests, you can test your knowledge of different exam sections, such as General Science, Arithmetic Reasoning, Word Knowledge and Paragraph Comprehension. We'll show you which answers you get correct and which subjects you've mastered. These practice tests also identify the questions you get wrong, so you can go back to specific course lessons and review the material further. These convenient ASVAB practice tests will help you understand what you know well, what you still need to study and how prepared you are overall.
The other written test format is the Student ASVAB which is given at high schools, vocational schools, or colleges. This test lasts approximately three hours. The Written Arithmetic Reasoning subtest of the ASVAB consists of 30 multiple choice questions, which must be answered in 36 minutes. Below are a few sample questions which are very similar to the actual questions you'll see on the ASVAB:
The ASVAB test can be taken at your school or a MEPS (Military Entrance Processing Stations) or MET (Mobile Examination Test) sites.  When the ASVAB is administered at your school, it is usually part of the Student Testing Program or Career Exploration Program.  When the ASVAB is given at MEPS or MET sites, it is part of the Enlistment Testing Program.  The ASVAB test content is the same no matter where you take it, except that you will not have to take the Assembling Objects test if you take the test at your school (as part of the Student Testing Program).  When you take the test in the Student Testing Program you will receive three composite scores (Verbal Skills, Math Skills, and Science and Technical Skills).  When you take the ASVAB as part of the Enlistment Testing Program, you will receive an AFQT (Armed Forces Qualification Test) score and Service composite scores.  These scores are used for assigning your military job.
How good is your vocabulary? It’s never too late to brush up by using “vocabulary builders” you find on Google, reading a variety of books, manuals and magazines, and using practice tests to identify words that you’re not sure of. The WK section tests your word knowledge in several ways. First, it tests whether you can recognize correct and incorrect spellings of words. For this type of question, you may want to review words that are often spelled incorrectly, and make sure you know how to spell them. You will also need to know the definitions of words, and be able to use them in a sentence. The more you practice, the better you will be at automatically recognizing the right spelling of a word, and the easier it will be to know it’s precise meaning when it’s used in a sentence.
There is another ASVAB score that's equally important, if not more so, because it is the score that determines if a person is eligible for military service. It's the Armed Forces Qualification Test score, or AFQT score. This score is calculated from only four of the nine Standard Scores on the ASVAB - Arithmetic Reasoning (AR), Mathematics Knowledge (MK), Paragraph Comprehension (PC), and Word Knowledge (WK). First, the WK and PC scores are added together, then the sum is doubled. This is known as the Verbal Expression (VE) score. The VE, MK, and AR scores are then added together, and the sum is the AFQT. This score is a straight percentile measure, expressed as a number from 1-99. The number is the percentage of people who scored lower than the test taker. For example, if a person receives an AFQT score of 63, that means that he did better on the test than 63% of the people who have taken it.
In addition to the ASVAB's AFQT, each branch has military occupational specialty, or MOS, scores. Combinations of scores from the nine tests are used to determine qualification for a MOS. These combinations are called "aptitude area scores", "composite scores", or "line scores". Each of the five armed services has its own aptitude area scores and sets its own minimum composite scores for each MOS.

The AFQT is often mistakenly called the “overall ASVAB score.” You commonly hear someone say, “I got a 67 on the ASVAB,” or “My ASVAB score was 92.” That’s not correct; it implies that the AFQT is derived from all nine subtests of the ASVAB, and it’s not. The AFQT score is computed from just four of the ASVAB subtests that measure your math and communicative ability.
The AFQT score is the most important ASVAB score, because it determines if you can enlist in the U.S. Army. However, the U.S. Army also converts the ASVAB test scores into 10 other composite score areas known as "line scores" that determine what MOS an individual may qualify for. Listed below are the parts of the ASVAB that affect your AFQT test scores and each of the ten line scores.
Varsity Tutors’ ASVAB Learning Tools can also help you work in groups, if you so choose. They let you post results on social media so others can see how you did. Many people actually share their progress over time and make this an opportunity to help one another; they’ll even compete in practice tests to make them more fun. The ASVAB practice tests provide a sample of the material you’ll be asked to work with on test day. They are structured in a precise, non-intimidating format with honest and detailed feedback. The study process is made simpler and more efficient while also facilitating a more personalized process of studying.
The ASVAB test can be taken at your school or a MEPS (Military Entrance Processing Stations) or MET (Mobile Examination Test) sites.  When the ASVAB is administered at your school, it is usually part of the Student Testing Program or Career Exploration Program.  When the ASVAB is given at MEPS or MET sites, it is part of the Enlistment Testing Program.  The ASVAB test content is the same no matter where you take it, except that you will not have to take the Assembling Objects test if you take the test at your school (as part of the Student Testing Program).  When you take the test in the Student Testing Program you will receive three composite scores (Verbal Skills, Math Skills, and Science and Technical Skills).  When you take the ASVAB as part of the Enlistment Testing Program, you will receive an AFQT (Armed Forces Qualification Test) score and Service composite scores.  These scores are used for assigning your military job.
Don’t be fooled by the appearance of the low numbers, the algorithm that computes the AFQT is very sophisticated. Just because your ASVAB score is 40 doesn’t mean that you only got 40% of the questions correct, it could simply mean that you lack strength in one area, but succeed with high praise in another. Your ASVAB score is only a means by which you are categorized for available positions; it is by no means a measure of intelligence.
Varsity Tutors’ ASVAB Learning Tools can also help you work in groups, if you so choose. They let you post results on social media so others can see how you did. Many people actually share their progress over time and make this an opportunity to help one another; they’ll even compete in practice tests to make them more fun. The ASVAB practice tests provide a sample of the material you’ll be asked to work with on test day. They are structured in a precise, non-intimidating format with honest and detailed feedback. The study process is made simpler and more efficient while also facilitating a more personalized process of studying.
High school and postsecondary students can also take the ASVAB test as part of the Department of Defense’s Career Exploration Program. This paper-and-pencil version of the test is the same as the paper-and-pencil enlistment version but excludes the Assembling Objects section. It is intended to help those students considering a career in the military to discover their strengths in both military and civilian jobs. If the student scores high enough in the AFQT section of the test, he may use the score to enlist within the two-year expiration window.
One ASVAB sub-measure, the Armed Forces Qualification Test (AFQT)--which is just a separate analysis of the same tests that focuses only on four of the subtests--is also population-referenced, but its score from 1-99 is a percentile score. This means that if you score a 73, you scored as well as or higher than 73% of test-takers in the national sample.
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