I thought I was just buying an extra book, that I would most likely not put attention to. But, it was not. This book is filled with practice questions, which I got to study before hand thanks to the "2015 / 2016 ASVAB For Dummies". These two books makes a great combination. One to study and the other to test how far you have improved by testing yourself. I am glad I bought it. I recommend it to everyone who is thinking of taking the ASVAB or the AFQT. Just have in mind, that this book is all about questions, of course it will give you the correct answer in the back of it, but it will not go into detail as much as the "2015 / 2016 ASVAB For Dummies" book.
My recruiter told me about this book so I ordered it and got it 3 days later from the Military Bookstore. I got this book and it is awesome. The cd works great and every thing I needed and more to help me was in there. I recommend this book to everyone who is thinking of going in the service and wants to get a real job! GET THIS BOOK AND SCORE HIGH!!!!”
Each year, many high school and postsecondary students take the free Armed Services Vocational Aptitude battery (ASVAB).  The ASVAB is the most widely used multiple-aptitude test battery in the world.  It consists of eight tests that measure your skills and abilities in the following areas:  General Science; Arithmetic Reasoning; World Knowledge; Paragraph Comprehension; Mathematics Knowledge; Electronics Information; Auto and Shop Information; Mechanical Comprehension.
A military recruiter determines if the candidate is a possible recruit. A recruiter will ask about marital status, health, education, drug use, and arrest record. It is important for the candidate to be upfront and truthful when answering questions. Once the recruiter has determined the individual is qualified for additional processing, the ASVAB is scheduled. A physical examination may also be conducted at the time of the test. 
If you are interested in using your test scores for military service, you will receive an Armed Forces Qualification Test (AFQT) score. This score is calculated using the scores from the Word Knowledge (WK), Paragraph Comprehension (PC), Arithmetic Reasoning (AR), and Mathematics Knowledge (MK) portions of the exam. AFQT scores are expressed as percentile scores in order to better compare results among all potential military recruits.
Educational Opportunities–More educational opportunities are available than ever before.  Alternatives to traditional education, such as online courses and weekend or evening programs, allow individuals to obtain higher education while working full-time.  New technology, such as live podcasts and streaming videos on demand, make it possible for people to learn at their own pace in their own place.  Education is a lifelong process.  Many people now choose to combine their education with work experience.  For instance, instead of attending a four-year college immediately after high school, some people get a two-year degree in a particular field and then enter the job force.  At some point, they may choose to complete a certificate program or a four-year degree to advance in their chosen field.  Other people choose to enter the Military to take advantage of the educational benefits and training that is provided.  There are a variety of occupations and career paths that you can pursue with different levels of education.  Do not rule out a given career field simply because you think that the educational requirements might be more than what you would like to pursue after high school.
1001 ASVAB Practice Questions For Dummies takes you beyond the instruction and guidance offered in ASVAB For Dummies, giving you 1,001 opportunities to practice answering questions on key concepts for all nine ASVAB subtests. Plus, an online component provides you with a collection of additional problems presented in multiple-choice format to further help you test your skills as you go.
The Mathematics Knowledge section of the exam measures your knowledge of various math areas, such as algebra and geometry. You may be asked to find the square root of a number or the volume of a brick with given dimensions. Algebraic problems may require finding the value of “y” in a given equation. A review of math symbols—such as ≠, ≤, and √—can help you solve the given problems much faster, and using our ASVAB math study guide to practice answering the algebra and geometry questions on the test can help increase your overall AFQT score. The CAT-ASVAB has 16 questions in 20 minutes; the paper-and-pencil version has 25 questions in 24 minutes.

Educational Opportunities–More educational opportunities are available than ever before.  Alternatives to traditional education, such as online courses and weekend or evening programs, allow individuals to obtain higher education while working full-time.  New technology, such as live podcasts and streaming videos on demand, make it possible for people to learn at their own pace in their own place.  Education is a lifelong process.  Many people now choose to combine their education with work experience.  For instance, instead of attending a four-year college immediately after high school, some people get a two-year degree in a particular field and then enter the job force.  At some point, they may choose to complete a certificate program or a four-year degree to advance in their chosen field.  Other people choose to enter the Military to take advantage of the educational benefits and training that is provided.  There are a variety of occupations and career paths that you can pursue with different levels of education.  Do not rule out a given career field simply because you think that the educational requirements might be more than what you would like to pursue after high school.
The next requirement comes as a fairly basic need for the military to identify possible threats it may be called upon to face. For this purpose, some of the commanding forces and other military, as well as often civilian personnel participate in identification of these threats. This is at once an organisation, a system and a process collectively called military intelligence (MI).
When you are considered a career in the military you need to take the ASVAB test. But each branch of the military has different ASVAB requirements that you need to meet. They are different levels of education that you must reach to take the test. But you also need to score a certain amount of points on that ASVAB test to gain access into the branch you desire.
We hope you find our study guides useful as you begin preparing to take the ASVAB! If you’re social like we are, please reach out to us on Facebook, Twitter, Google+, and Pinterest. We’d love to answer your questions, get your feedback, or just hear more about your thoughts on the ASVAB or your intended branch of service. Good luck studying and congrats as you take this exciting first step towards your military career!
If you didn't earn a score that was high enough to be accepted to your chosen branch of the military, or if you didn't earn a line score high enough to qualify for a desired career option, then you may retake the ASVAB. You must wait a full month before you can take the ASVAB a second time. If you wish to take the test a third time, you must wait another month from the date of your second attempt. After the third attempt, there is a waiting period of 6 months before you can take the test again.
The Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB) is one of the most widely used multiple-aptitude test batteries in the world. It was originally designed to predict success in military occupations and is used today to help both those considering entering the military (mostly high school-aged students, but also anyone who is eligible to enlist) as well as those not interested in military service (who comprise the majority of current ASVAB test takers) what sort of career may be the best fit for them. Scores from the ASVAB can be used when enlisting in the military. Students interested in taking the ASVAB should check with their high school to find out when and if the ASVAB will be offered at their school. If it is not offered, students should meet with their guidance counselor to determine if it is possible to schedule a testing session in the future. There is no cost to take the ASVAB.
Trends in recruiting 1975–2001 showing total numbers of enlisted recruits in all branches of US armed forces in light blue and percentage of recruiting goals met in dark blue. Percentage of recruits with at least a high school diploma is shown in gold, percentage with an above average AFQT in orange, and the percentage called "high quality", with both a diploma and above-average AFQT score, is in purple.[1]

The ASVAB also known as the Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery is a test that measures your aptitude which is how well you do something.  A common mistake by most people is thinking that it is a measure of you IQ. Many people either forget this or don’t know this and they get worked up about the exam.  Saying that, it is also important to take a ASVAB sample test to insure you know what type of questions will be asked.    Another thing to keep in mind is every person in the armed forces has to take the exam and you are not being called out to take it. 
The vast majority of ASVAB test takers will ultimately not enlist in the military. The ASVAB Career Exploration Program claims that only two-and-a-half percent of those who participate in the ASVAB join the military. Forty-seven percent of those who take the exam indicate an interest in attending a four-year college, and 16 percent of those who take the exam originally indicate some kind of an interest in joining the military.
Whereas recruits who join as officers tend to be upwardly-mobile,[14][15] most enlisted personnel have a childhood background of relative socio-economic deprivation.[16][17][18] For example, after the US suspended conscription in 1973, "the military disproportionately attracted African American men, men from lower-status socioeconomic backgrounds, men who had been in nonacademic high school programs, and men whose high school grades tended to be low".[14]

The Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB) is a comprehensive test that helps determine students’ eligibility and suitability for careers in the military. Students who score in the 31st percentile are eligible for a wide variety of careers (combined with standards such as physical condition and personal conduct). Students and schools are also encouraged to take advantage of a free career exploration program that links personal interests with demonstrated aptitudes from the 9 ASVAB subtests, half of which relate to vocational skills, in addition to math and verbal skills.


Trends in recruiting 1975–2001 showing total numbers of enlisted recruits in all branches of US armed forces in light blue and percentage of recruiting goals met in dark blue. Percentage of recruits with at least a high school diploma is shown in gold, percentage with an above average AFQT in orange, and the percentage called "high quality", with both a diploma and above-average AFQT score, is in purple.[1]

By military department, $146.9 billion was allocated for the Department of the Army, $168.8 billion for the Department of the Navy, $161.8 billion for the Department of the Air Force and $102.8 billion for DoD-wide spending.[6] By function, $138.6 billion was requested for personnel, $244.4 billion for operations and maintenance, $118.9 billion for procurement, $69.0 billion for research and development, $1.3 billion for revolving and management funds, $6.9 billion for military construction and $1.3 billion for family housing.[6]
There are two types of military history, although almost all texts have elements of both: descriptive history, that serves to chronicle conflicts without offering any statements about the causes, nature of conduct, the ending, and effects of a conflict; and analytical history, that seeks to offer statements about the causes, nature, ending, and aftermath of conflicts – as a means of deriving knowledge and understanding of conflicts as a whole, and prevent repetition of mistakes in future, to suggest better concepts or methods in employing forces, or to advocate the need for new technology.
Just as the President, the Secretary of Defense, and the Secretary of Homeland Security, are in charge of the entire military establishment, maintaining civilian control of the military, so too are each of the Defense Department's constitutive military departments headed by civilians. The four DoD branches are organized into three departments, each with civilian heads. The Department of the Army is headed by the Secretary of the Army, the Department of the Navy is headed by the Secretary of the Navy and the Department of the Air Force is headed by the Secretary of the Air Force. The Marine Corps is organized under the Department of the Navy, however it is still considered a separate and equal service. The Coast Guard is under the Department of Homeland Security and receives its operational orders from the Secretary of Homeland Security. However, the Coast Guard may be transferred to the Department of the Navy by the President or Congress during a time of war, thereby placing it within the DoD.[19]
Once you have learned about yourself, you are ready to begin exploring different career options.  Chances for a rewarding career are improved if you select a career field that matches your interests, values, skills, and abilities.  While learning about various careers, you should be constantly asking yourself, “How well does this career match my current interests, values, and abilities?” and “Will this career lead to a lifestyle I want?”

One of the oldest military publications is The Art of War, by the Chinese philosopher Sun Tzu.[34] Written in the 6th century BCE, the 13-chapter book is intended as military instruction, and not as military theory, but has had a huge influence on Asian military doctrine, and from the late 19th century, on European and United States military planning. It has even been used to formulate business tactics, and can even be applied in social and political areas.[where?]


After the final ability estimate is computed, it is converted to a standard score on the ASVAB score scale that has been statistically linked to the ability estimate through a process called equating. Equating studies are conducted for every paper and pencil ASVAB form to ensure that scores have the same meaning regardless of which test form the examinee receives.
Including U.S. territories and ships afloat within territorial waters As of 31 December 2009, a total of 1,137,568 personnel were on active duty within the United States and its territories (including 84,461 afloat).[31] The vast majority (941,629 personnel) were stationed at bases within the contiguous United States. There were an additional 37,245 in Hawaii and 20,450 in Alaska while 84,461 were at sea, 2,972 in Guam and 179 in Puerto Rico.
First, the ASVAB measures your accumulated knowledge in different areas. So if you are currently in school, stay focused and study hard. Your overall knowledge gained in school will most likely be reflected in your ASVAB score. Second, though accumulated knowledge is important, you may be able to raise your score by preparing specifically for the ASVAB, especially in areas where you are weak. Various study guides are available for this purpose (listed left).
During World War I, the need to break the deadlock of trench warfare saw the rapid development of many new technologies, particularly tanks. Military aviation was extensively used, and bombers became decisive in many battles of World War II, which marked the most frantic period of weapons development in history. Many new designs, and concepts were used in combat, and all existing technologies of warfare were improved between 1939 and 1945.
The ASVAB test is administered to potential military recruits to help determine which branch of service and which military jobs they will be best suited for. It is not a test of intelligence and is administered only in English. The test consists of nine subjects: General Science, Arithmetic Reasoning, Word Knowledge, Paragraph Comprehension, Mathematics Knowledge, Electronics Information, Auto and Shop Information, Mechanical Comprehension, and Assembling Objects.
These supply points are also used to provide military engineering services, such as the recovery of defective and derelict vehicles and weapons, maintenance of weapons in the field, the repair and field modification of weapons and equipment; and in peacetime, the life-extension programmes undertaken to allow continued use of equipment. One of the most important role of logistics is the supply of munitions as a primary type of consumable, their storage, and disposal.
Don’t let the PC section of the test throw you for a loop. Unlike the individual multiple choice questions in other sections, here you will need to read a paragraph and answer several questions in a row based on that one paragraph. The people who designed this section of the exam really knew how to make sure you are able to read detailed (and often boring) documents, remember the details of what you read, understand why they’re important, and be able to pick out the key concepts they illustrate. When you read each paragraph, it’s helpful to know the kinds of questions you’ll be asked at the end. There are basically four kinds of questions to test your comprehension:
These scores include your Armed Forces Qualification Test (AFQT) score as well as your scores on each of the 9 individual subtests that make up the ASVAB.  When you get your report, the most important score you will want to look for first is your AFQT score.  This score determines your eligibility to serve in the military and to enlist in the U.S. Marines you need to have achieved a score of at least 32.
Any test prep guide is only as good as its practice questions and answers, and that's another area where our guide stands out. Our test designers have provided scores of test questions that will prepare you for what to expect on the actual AFQT Exam. Each answer is explained in depth, in order to make the principles and reasoning behind it crystal clear.
The test measures competency in 9 different subjects, which include General Science, Electronics Information, Auto and Shop Information, Mechanical Comprehension, Assembling Objects, Word Knowledge, Paragraph Comprehension, Arithmetic Reasoning, and Mathematics Knowledge. These last four sections- Word Knowledge, Paragraph Comprehension, Arithmetic Reasoning, and Mathematics Knowledge are the most important, as they make up something called the AFQT (Armed Forces Qualifications Test). An applicant’s AFQT score is what determines whether or not they are able to serve in the military at all, as each branch has minimum scores for enlistment.
The Armed Forces Qualification Test (AFQT) is used by all of the Services to determine if an applicant is eligible for the military. Four of the ASVAB subtests are combined to form the AFQT. It measures general cognitive ability and is composed of verbal and mathematics subtests. AFQT scores are grouped into categories for reporting purposes. The table below shows the AFQT categories and the percentile score ranges corresponding to the categories. Applicants that score in AFQT category IIIA or higher may qualify for enlistment incentives.
Whereas recruits who join as officers tend to be upwardly-mobile,[14][15] most enlisted personnel have a childhood background of relative socio-economic deprivation.[16][17][18] For example, after the US suspended conscription in 1973, "the military disproportionately attracted African American men, men from lower-status socioeconomic backgrounds, men who had been in nonacademic high school programs, and men whose high school grades tended to be low".[14]
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The ASVAB tests recruits in ten different areas. It is presented as ten short tests administered over a three-hour period. Traditionally, the ASVAB is a “proctored” test, meaning that it has required supervision to administer in order to maintain the integrity of the test. However, changes to military recruiting and technology in general have helped the ASVAB evolve as a 21st century tool.

There are nine different test areas as part of the ASVAB: general science, arithmetic reasoning, word knowledge, paragraph comprehension, mathematics knowledge, electronics information, auto and shop information, assembling objects, and mechanical comprehension. The paragraph comprehension test area contains the fewest questions with 15. The word knowledge test area contains the most questions with 35. All other sections contain 20, 25, or 30 questions. Taking numerious ASVAB practice tests is recommended for test day success.


Your success on ASVAB test day depends not only on how many hours you put into preparing, but also on whether you prepared the right way. It’s good to check along the way to see whether your studying is paying off. One of the most effective ways to do this is by taking ASVAB practice tests to evaluate your progress. Practice tests are useful because they show exactly where you need to improve. Every time you take a ASVAB practice test, pay special attention to these three groups of questions:

The ASVAB site goes on to explain that “after the final ability estimate is computed, it is converted to a standard score on the ASVAB score scale that has been statistically linked to the ability estimate through a process called equating. Equating studies are conducted for every paper and pencil ASVAB form to ensure that scores have the same meaning regardless of which test form the examinee receives.”
The ASVAB test is administered to potential military recruits to help determine which branch of service and which military jobs they will be best suited for. It is not a test of intelligence and is administered only in English. The test consists of nine subjects: General Science, Arithmetic Reasoning, Word Knowledge, Paragraph Comprehension, Mathematics Knowledge, Electronics Information, Auto and Shop Information, Mechanical Comprehension, and Assembling Objects.
Battlefield commission: under certain conditions, enlisted personnel who have skills that separate them from their peers can become officers by direct commissioning of a commander so authorized to grant them. This type of commission is rarely granted and is reserved only for the most exceptional enlisted personnel; it is done on an ad hoc basis, typically only in wartime. No direct battlefield commissions have been awarded since the Vietnam War. The Navy and Air Force do not employ this commissioning path.
Limited Duty Officer: due to the highly technical nature of some officer billets, the Marine Corps, Navy and Coast Guard employ a system of promoting proven senior enlisted members to the ranks of commissioned officers. They fill a need that is similar to, but distinct from that filled by warrant officers (to the point where their accession is through the same school). While warrant officers remain technical experts, LDOs take on the role of a generalist, like that of officers commissioned through more traditional sources. LDOs are limited, not by their authority, but by the types of billets they are allowed to fill. However, in recent times they have come to be used more and more like their more-traditional counterparts.
Less hot under the collar than This Year's Model, Armed Forces was partly inspired by Elvis Costello and the Attractions' 1978 American tour. The songs are set to deceptively poppy arrangements that use plinky Abba keyboards ("Oliver's Army," a hit single about mercenaries), Beatles-ish devices (the fade on "Party Girl"), and whimsical waltz-time signatures ("Sunday's Best") to mask their core cynicism. "Goon Squad," "Busy Bodies," and "Accidents Will Happen" are among Costello's most melodically powerful songs to this point, leading the way to the masterful Get Happy!!. --Barney Hoskyns
The Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB test--also known as the AFQT (Armed Forces Qualification Test). This is the score used by the recruiter to determine a potential recruit’s enlistment eligibility, assign a recruit to a military jobs, and aid students in career exploration. The AFQT is actually a subset of the ASVAB - only with scores of four of the ten test sections calculated.

8. Use the following passage to answer questions 8 and 9. Harry went to the drugstore and purchased band-aids, pain relievers and cold medication. He also picked up two prescriptions. He then stopped by the hardware store and bought nails, screws and a first aid kit. Finally, he went to the grocery store and bought orange juice, flour and eggs. Where did Harry buy the first aid kit?

GED holders who earn 15 college credits 100 level or greater are considered equivalent with those holding high school diplomas, so that they need only the Tier I score to enlist. Eligibility is not determined by score alone. Certain recruiting goal practices may require an applicant to achieve a higher score than the required minimum AFQT score in order to be considered for enlistment. Rules and regulations are subject to change; applicants should call their local recruiting center for up to date qualification information.[4][5]
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