A century or so later, in the hands of writers such as Jean Froissart, Miguel Cervantes and William Shakespeare, the fictional knight Tirant lo Blanch, and the real-life condottieri John Hawkwood would be juxtaposed against the fantastical Don Quixote, and the carousing Sir John Falstaff. In just one play, Henry V, Shakespeare provides a whole range of military characters, from cool-headed and clear-sighted generals, to captains, and common soldiery.

At this point, it should be clear that an ASVAB practice test is required. The next decision is regarding the people that should be trusted to provide the test. Well, that is undoubtedly the nation's practice tests. They have a team of men and women that thoroughly analyze all areas that are covered on the ASVAB test. In addition to that, those men and women examine previous test questions and implement those so that the user of the tests is provided with the most precise questions. Lastly, one can say based on the unequivocal evidence that individuals that prepare with these ASVAB practice tests excel.

The military organization is characterized by a strict hierarchy divided by military rank, with ranks normally grouped (in descending order of authority) as officers (e.g. Colonel), non-commissioned officers (e.g. Sergeant), and personnel at the lowest rank (e.g. Private Soldier). While senior officers make strategic decisions, subordinated military personnel (soldiers, sailors, marines, or airmen) fulfil them. Although rank titles vary by military branch and country, the rank hierarchy is common to all state armed forces worldwide.
The Paragraph Comprehension section of the test measures your ability to read a passage and interpret the information contained within it. You may read a selection and be asked to interpret the author’s purpose, or what a particular word in the passage means, based on the context of the sentence where it appears. To help you better prepare for the exam, the Paragraph Comprehension section of the ASVAB practice test has passages of similar length and style to those on the actual ASVAB test. The CAT-ASVAB test has 11 questions in 22 minutes; the paper-and-pencil version has 15 questions in 13 minutes.
Registration for the ASVAB is done entirely through your local recruiter. They will not want to start the application process without being confident that you will be a qualified applicant, so they will first ask you some information about your age, fitness, and marital status, among other things. They will likely also administer a short practice exam before taking you to a testing center to either give you a realistic idea of which jobs you would qualify for or to help you decide if it would be better to study before taking it.

Although mostly concerned with the military transport, as a means of delivery using different modes of transport; from military trucks, to container ships operating from permanent military base, it also involves creating field supply dumps at the rear of the combat zone, and even forward supply points in specific unit's Tactical Area of Responsibility.


The AFQT score is the most important ASVAB score, because it determines if you can enlist in the U.S. Army. However, the U.S. Army also converts the ASVAB test scores into 10 other composite score areas known as "line scores" that determine what MOS an individual may qualify for. Listed below are the parts of the ASVAB that affect your AFQT test scores and each of the ten line scores.
After adopting the test in 1976 the test became a way of indicating whether or not an individual was 100% qualified to serve. As previously mentioned this aptitude test has a colorful history. That is because it underwent a dramatic change in 2002 and another dramatic change in 2004. The change that occurred in 2002 expanded the categories of the test and the overall difficulty. This can be seen by the addition of all of the diverse categories below:

One ASVAB sub-measure, the Armed Forces Qualification Test (AFQT)--which is just a separate analysis of the same tests that focuses only on four of the subtests--is also population-referenced, but its score from 1-99 is a percentile score. This means that if you score a 73, you scored as well as or higher than 73% of test-takers in the national sample.

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