Air Force recruits must score at least 36 points the 99-point ASVAB. The overall ASVAB score is known as the AFQT score, or Armed Forces Qualification Test score. Exceptions may be made, however, for a handful of high school graduates who can score as low as 31. The vast majority, some 70 percent, of those accepted for an Air Force enlistment achieve a score of 50 or above.
At this point, it should be clear that an ASVAB practice test is required. The next decision is regarding the people that should be trusted to provide the test. Well, that is undoubtedly the nation's practice tests. They have a team of men and women that thoroughly analyze all areas that are covered on the ASVAB test. In addition to that, those men and women examine previous test questions and implement those so that the user of the tests is provided with the most precise questions. Lastly, one can say based on the unequivocal evidence that individuals that prepare with these ASVAB practice tests excel.
The last requirement of the military is for military performance assessment, and learning from it. These two functions are performed by military historians and military theorists who seek to identify failures and success of the armed force, and integrate corrections into the military reform, with the aim of producing an improved force capable of performing adequately, should there be a national defence policy review.

The General Science section of the test covers earth, space, and physical and life sciences. Because science is such a vast and dynamic topic, focus your study on basic principles. This gives you a good foundation to work through any question that is asked of you. Typical questions may include: “Why is air less dense than water?” or “How do you convert Celsius temperature to Fahrenheit?” The CAT-ASVAB test asks 16 questions in 8 minutes, while the pencil-and-paper version asks 25 questions in 11 minutes.
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The vast majority of ASVAB test takers will ultimately not enlist in the military. The ASVAB Career Exploration Program claims that only two-and-a-half percent of those who participate in the ASVAB join the military. Forty-seven percent of those who take the exam indicate an interest in attending a four-year college, and 16 percent of those who take the exam originally indicate some kind of an interest in joining the military.
The AFQT has been used in non-military settings as a proxy measure of intelligence, for example, in Herrnstein & Murray's book The Bell Curve. Because of the test's significance both inside and outside military settings, it is important to examine what the test measures, i.e. to evaluate the construct validity of the AFQT. Kaufman's 2010 review stated that David Marks (2010) scanned the literature for datasets containing test estimates for populations or groups taking both the AFQT and tests of literacy. One study on nine groups of soldiers differing in job and reading ability found a correlation of .96 between the AFQT and reading achievement (Sticht, Caylor, Kern, & Fox, 1972). Another study showed significant improvements among Black and Hispanic populations in their AFQT scores between 1980 and 1992 while Whites only showed a slight decrement (Kilburn, Hanser, & Klerman, 1998). Another study obtained reading scores for 17-year olds for those same ethnic groups and dates (Campbell et al., 2000) and found a correlation of .997 between reading scores and AFQT scores. This nearly perfect correlation was based on six pairs of data points from six independent population samples evaluated by two separate groups of investigators. According to Marks, "On the basis of the studies summarized here, there can be little doubt that the Armed Forces Qualifications Test is a measure of literacy." However, it is important to note that AFQT has been shown to correlate more highly with classic IQ tests than they do with one another, and that the "crystallized" intelligence measured by AFQT is measured very similarly by Wechsler, in particular.[8]

Standard Scores are scores that have a fixed mean and standard deviation in the population of examinees. A Standard Score indicates how many units of the standard deviation a particular score is above or below the mean. In the case of the ASVAB subtests, the mean is set to 50 and the standard deviation is set to 10. Thus, a Standard Score of 40 indicates that the examinee scored 1 standard deviation below the mean. A Standard Score of 70 indicates that the examinee scored 2 standard deviations above the mean. To learn more about how standard scores are derived and used, click here.


The various armed forces adopted all of those aspects in 1976. At that point in time, the test was in its written form rather than today’s more common form (computerized test format). The written form covers all of the previously mentioned areas as well, which is why both forms are still available. All-in-all that answers the question concerning the intention of the test.

This will show you exactly what your weak areas are, and where you need to devote more study time. Ask yourself why each of these questions gave you trouble. Was it because you didn’t understand the material? Was it because you didn’t remember the vocabulary? Do you need more repetitions on this type of question to build speed and confidence? Dig into those questions and figure out how you can strengthen your weak areas as you go back to review the material.


If you’re planning on using your scores for military enlistment, you may be hoping to achieve a score that is high enough for a specific signing bonus. While it’s natural to want to do your best, putting extra pressure on yourself can cause unnecessary anxiety. Take a few deep breaths, relax, and remember that taking the test is only part of the entire recruitment process.
This course is designed to help you dust the cobwebs off information you may have learned long ago or boost your scores if you have already taken the test (or a sample test administered by a recruiter) and did not meet the score you needed for the occupation you desire. This review is particularly helpful if you have been out of school for some time, did not graduate a standard high school program, or either did not take or performed poorly in classes related certain subject areas (e.g. shop or automotive classes). Within each subject area, the lessons build on one another, so we will help you progress in a logical manner in bite-sized, 10-minute-or-less chunks. Skip to the lessons that you know you need to focus on, and even jump to specific portions of the videos using the video tags. Use the quizzes, chapter tests, and course exam to see how you're doing and refocus your studies as necessary.

AFQT scores are reported as percentiles between 1-99. An AFQT percentile score indicates the percentage of examinees in a reference group that scored at or below that particular score. For current AFQT scores, the reference group is a sample of 18 to 23 year old youth who took the ASVAB as part of a national study conducted in 1997. Thus, an AFQT score of 95 indicates that the examinee scored as well as or better than 95% of the nationally-representative sample of 18 to 23 year olds. An AFQT score of 60 indicates that the examinee scored as well as or better than 60% of the nationally-representative sample.
In the 2000s, women can serve on U.S. combat ships, including in command roles. They are permitted to serve on submarines.[39] Women can fly military aircraft and make up 2% of all pilots in the U.S. Military. In 2003, Major Kim Campbell was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross for landing her combat damaged A-10 Thunderbolt II with no hydraulic control and only one functional engine after being struck by hostile fire over Baghdad.
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