Another big advantage of practice tests is that they are fun. It’s fun to challenge yourself and see what you know. Instead of wondering if you are studying the right things or just wasting your valuable time, good practice tests can help you find out what you need to know while injecting your study time with excitement and competition as you try to outdo yourself each time you take a test.
General Science tests the ability to answer questions on a variety of science topics drawn from courses taught in most high schools. The life science items cover botany, zoology, anatomy and physiology, and ecology. The earth and space science items are based on astronomy, geology, meteorology and oceanography. The physical science items measure force and motion mechanics, energy, fluids, atomic structure and chemistry.
On the Learning Tools website, your options include 10-question ASVAB General Science practice tests. These ask you to use terms in context, define terms, and complete basic math problems. You may also be asked to categorize items and answer questions related to general scientific facts. The ASVAB Math Practice Tests are exercises that challenge your ability to correctly answer word problems based on sales and profit, speed, time, area, and other relational concepts.

Figure 2.7 shows FY 1977 as the low point and FY 1992 as the high point in accessing recruits in Categories I to IIIA. In FY 1977, 34 percent of accessions scored in the top half of the AFQT distribution. Only 13 percent of Blacks, 19 percent of Hispanics, and 20 percent of "Others" scored in Categories I–IIIA. [3] Fifteen years later, in FY 1992, the majority of minority accessions achieved scores in the I–IIIA range (Blacks - 56 percent, Hispanics - 67 percent, "Others" - 67 percent). Hispanics have shown the most marked increase, with a 48-percentage-point gain in Category I to IIIA accessions from FY 1977 to FY 1992.
The Assembling Objects section of the ASVAB practice test measures your ability to determine how an object will look when its parts are put together. You will be shown an illustration of pieces and asked to choose which one, among a selection of finished diagrams, shows how they fit together. The CAT-ASVAB has 16 questions in 16 minutes, while the paper-and-pencil version has 25 questions in 15 minutes.
On the Learning Tools website, your options include 10-question ASVAB General Science practice tests. These ask you to use terms in context, define terms, and complete basic math problems. You may also be asked to categorize items and answer questions related to general scientific facts. The ASVAB Math Practice Tests are exercises that challenge your ability to correctly answer word problems based on sales and profit, speed, time, area, and other relational concepts.
As an adjective, military originally referred only to soldiers and soldiering, but it soon broadened to apply to land forces in general, and anything to do with their profession.[2] The names of both the Royal Military Academy (1741) and United States Military Academy (1802) reflect this. However, at about the time of the Napoleonic Wars, 'military' began to be used in reference to armed forces as a whole,[2] and in the 21st century expressions like 'military service', 'military intelligence', and 'military history' encompass naval and air force aspects. As such, it now connotes any activity performed by armed force personnel.
First, the ASVAB measures your accumulated knowledge in different areas. So if you are currently in school, stay focused and study hard. Your overall knowledge gained in school will most likely be reflected in your ASVAB score. Second, though accumulated knowledge is important, you may be able to raise your score by preparing specifically for the ASVAB, especially in areas where you are weak. Various study guides are available for this purpose (listed left).
The Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB test--also known as the AFQT (Armed Forces Qualification Test). This is the score used by the recruiter to determine a potential recruit’s enlistment eligibility, assign a recruit to a military jobs, and aid students in career exploration. The AFQT is actually a subset of the ASVAB - only with scores of four of the ten test sections calculated.

Figure 2.7 shows FY 1977 as the low point and FY 1992 as the high point in accessing recruits in Categories I to IIIA. In FY 1977, 34 percent of accessions scored in the top half of the AFQT distribution. Only 13 percent of Blacks, 19 percent of Hispanics, and 20 percent of "Others" scored in Categories I–IIIA. [3] Fifteen years later, in FY 1992, the majority of minority accessions achieved scores in the I–IIIA range (Blacks - 56 percent, Hispanics - 67 percent, "Others" - 67 percent). Hispanics have shown the most marked increase, with a 48-percentage-point gain in Category I to IIIA accessions from FY 1977 to FY 1992.


In addition, your scores on the other ASVAB composite tests will determine your career field or military occupation eligibility. Since enlistment bonuses are usually tied to your choice of occupations, the better the score, the more opportunities you have. But keep in mind, it is impossible to literally "ace" the ASVAB, so your goal should be to simply do your best.
Each branch of the service operates its own Service Academy as a four-year institution of higher education. All students receive a full scholarship with a small monthly stipend. Upon graduation, you're commissioned as a second lieutenant in the Army, Air Force, or Marine Corps or as an ensign in the Navy or Coast Guard. Appointment to a service academy is extremely competitive. For more information, call 1-800-822-8762 (US Military Academy in West Point, New York), 1-800-638-9156 (US Naval Academy in Annapolis, Maryland), 1-800-443-9266 (US Air Force Academy in Colorado Springs, Colorado), 1-800-883-8724 (US Coast Guard Academy in New London, Connecticut), and 1-866-546-4778 (United States Merchant Marine Academy, Kings Point, New York).
The AFQT score is a percentile ranking between 1 and 99 that shows where your score is placed in relation to others. For example, if you score a 54 on the AFQT, this means that you scored as well as or better than 54% of other recruits. If you are not satisfied with your score and wish to retake the test to improve your chances at getting selected, you must wait a month before taking it again. You can retake the test as many times as you want, but after 3 attempts the waiting period jumps to 6 months.

Again, the ASVAB is a wide-ranging exam covering many different areas. The designers of ASVAB practice tests, at least the high quality ones, know this and have spent time researching past tests to come up with practice tests that feature questions covering areas commonly tested for on the real exam. Thus, taking practice tests is a great way to focus on the material that matters most and avoid wasting your time studying content that likely won’t be on the test.
The President of the United States is the Commander in Chief, who is responsible for all final decisions. The Secretary of the Department of Defense (DoD) has control over the military and each branch - except the Coast Guard, which is under the Dept. of Homeland Security. With over 2 million civilian and military employees, the DoD is the world's largest "company."

The AFQT is not a separate test but is the collection of scores from these four sections of the ASVAB. Due to the fact that the AFQT scores determine the eligibility for enlistment into the military, it is important to score as well as possible. This site is designed to provide candidates that are taking the ASVAB with additional opportunities to practice questions in preparation for the types of questions they will receive within the official AFQT test sections. We provide sample practice questions across all four sections, including a score at the end of the practice exam so you can check your performance.
You’ll find a great practice test and lots of other information about the ASVAB at the Department of Defense's ASVAB Career Exploration Program site (ASVABprogram.com). Since your test scores can have an impact on your Military Occupational Specialty (MOS)—and whether or not you can attend certain special schools (like Airborne school, Sniper school and many others)—we recommend you make the most of these additional resources.

At this point, it should be clear that an ASVAB practice test is required. The next decision is regarding the people that should be trusted to provide the test. Well, that is undoubtedly the nation's practice tests. They have a team of men and women that thoroughly analyze all areas that are covered on the ASVAB test. In addition to that, those men and women examine previous test questions and implement those so that the user of the tests is provided with the most precise questions. Lastly, one can say based on the unequivocal evidence that individuals that prepare with these ASVAB practice tests excel.

Taking the PiCAT exam may, depending on circumstances including scores and other factors, may relieve a new recruit of having to take the ASVAB in a proctored setting. In the past, recruits who were preparing to enter military service at Military Entrance Processing Station would take the ASVAB in a group setting; PiCAT can help new recruits avoid having to retake the test. PiCAT test performance and other factors will determine whether or not the ASVAB has to be taken at MEPS.


The bonus disc alone makes this worth most of the price. The Hollywood High live songs (9 of them) are amazingly well recorded, very energetic great performance, with an enthusiastic crowd that doesn't intrude on the music. If you remember the live "El Mocambo" bonus disc that was part of an EC boxed set several years ago, well this is FAR better than that. The Hollywood High set alone could have been released as a great live CD, possibly the only reason it wasn't was because it would be seen as too short. The "bonus disc" here has other songs (B sides, etc.) not from the original "Armed Forces" which are worthy and interesting as well.
One set of ASVAB scores – Career Exploration Scores – tells you your current strengths in verbal, math, science, and technical skills.  The scores allow you to compare your test performance with that of other students at your grade level and can help you determine your readiness for further education and training in different career areas.  You will also receive a Military Entrance Score that is important for entry into the Armed Services.  You can discuss your score with a military recruiter.
The Student ASVAB is the most flexible of the exams. It is typically provided to high school students to help them assess their skills, job prospects, potential military positions, or college majors. The ASVAB for students is essentially the same as the MET ASVAB exam, only students are not necessarily testing for positions within the military. The students’ school counselors examine their scores and help them decide on what to do after graduating from high school. This test is still an important component of a student’s education because it can help them identify their strengths and weaknesses and help set them on the right track for their future career goals.
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