The military organization is characterized by a strict hierarchy divided by military rank, with ranks normally grouped (in descending order of authority) as officers (e.g. Colonel), non-commissioned officers (e.g. Sergeant), and personnel at the lowest rank (e.g. Private Soldier). While senior officers make strategic decisions, subordinated military personnel (soldiers, sailors, marines, or airmen) fulfil them. Although rank titles vary by military branch and country, the rank hierarchy is common to all state armed forces worldwide.


In addition to the ASVAB's AFQT, each branch has military occupational specialty, or MOS, scores. Combinations of scores from the nine tests are used to determine qualification for a MOS. These combinations are called "aptitude area scores", "composite scores", or "line scores". Each of the five armed services has its own aptitude area scores and sets its own minimum composite scores for each MOS.
The majority of people who complete the exam have little intention of entering the military. However, it’s important to keep in mind that the United States military is actually one of the nation’s largest employers. If you’re undecided about your future after high school graduation, taking the test can give you a better picture of your options in both civilian and military life.
The Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB) is a comprehensive test that helps determine students’ eligibility and suitability for careers in the military. Students who score in the 31st percentile are eligible for a wide variety of careers (combined with standards such as physical condition and personal conduct). Students and schools are also encouraged to take advantage of a free career exploration program that links personal interests with demonstrated aptitudes from the 9 ASVAB subtests, half of which relate to vocational skills, in addition to math and verbal skills.
Our completely free ASVAB practice tests are the perfect way to brush up your skills. Take one of our many ASVAB practice tests for a run-through of commonly asked questions. You will receive incredibly detailed scoring results at the end of your ASVAB practice test to help you identify your strengths and weaknesses. Pick one of our ASVAB practice tests now and begin!

General Science tests the ability to answer questions on a variety of science topics drawn from courses taught in most high schools. The life science items cover botany, zoology, anatomy and physiology, and ecology. The earth and space science items are based on astronomy, geology, meteorology and oceanography. The physical science items measure force and motion mechanics, energy, fluids, atomic structure and chemistry.
After a candidate has completed the ASVAB they must wait one calendar month before retaking the exam. An additional calendar month must pass before retesting a second time. Six calendar months must pass before retaking the test a third time. The scores received from the ASVAB may be used for enlistment for up to two years from the initial test date. 

Registration for the ASVAB is done entirely through your local recruiter. They will not want to start the application process without being confident that you will be a qualified applicant, so they will first ask you some information about your age, fitness, and marital status, among other things. They will likely also administer a short practice exam before taking you to a testing center to either give you a realistic idea of which jobs you would qualify for or to help you decide if it would be better to study before taking it.
In order to perform well on the ASVAB, you should take a practice test to get an idea of what you’ll encounter on the actual test. Also, completing a practice test will help you to feel more at ease on test day. Reading the test instructions and focusing your full attention on each question are both important steps to take. As you work through the test, avoid spending too much time on a single question. The test has a time limit and you don’t want to fall into the trap of running out of time before you arrive at the end of the test. Taking the time to provide thoughtful answers to test questions allows you to offer a clear picture of your skills and capabilities. Earning a high score on the ASVAB may give you more options when it comes to choosing a specialty.
The ASVAB also known as the Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery is a test that measures your aptitude which is how well you do something.  A common mistake by most people is thinking that it is a measure of you IQ. Many people either forget this or don’t know this and they get worked up about the exam.  Saying that, it is also important to take a ASVAB sample test to insure you know what type of questions will be asked.    Another thing to keep in mind is every person in the armed forces has to take the exam and you are not being called out to take it. 
If you are pressed for time, it may be worthwhile to look into future ASVAB test dates in order to plan ahead in case you get a poor score on your upcoming ASVAB test. You can check with your high school counselor or your military recruiter to make sure that you will be eligible to take future tests along with your planned upcoming test date in the event that you get a bad ASVAB score.

Each service has a uniformed head who is considered the highest-ranking officer within their respective service, with the exception of the chairman and vice chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, and the chief of the National Guard Bureau. They are responsible for ensuring personnel readiness, policy, planning and training and equipping their respective military services for the combatant commanders to utilize. They also serve as senior military advisors to the President, the Secretary of Defense, their respective service secretaries, as well as other councils they may be called to serve on. They are as follows:
Understanding the ASVAB score range is to understand standard deviations. The highest score on the ASVAB is a 99 and the lowest score is a one. Scores are based on the mean of all examinees. This is to say that a score of 50 would account for an average score. Each increment of 10 represents a single standard deviation from the mean score. So, for example, a score of 80 would be three standard deviations better than the meanwhile a score of 30 would be two standard deviations lower than the mean score.

Any test prep guide is only as good as its practice questions and answers, and that's another area where our guide stands out. Our test designers have provided scores of test questions that will prepare you for what to expect on the actual AFQT Exam. Each answer is explained in depth, in order to make the principles and reasoning behind it crystal clear.
Since 1976, the multiple-choice ASVAB has been used for initial aptitude screening as well as MOS classification. The exam has changed since its inception. While some parts have remained, such as arithmetic reasoning and word knowledge, others like tool knowledge have been removed in favor of questions related to assembling objects. After nearly 20 years of research and development, a computer-adaptive version of the exam was implemented in 1996. The CAT-ASVAB is the first large-scale adaptive battery test to be administered in high-stakes environments like a Military Entrance Processing Station. The paper and pencil, or P&P version is still used at a variety of other military testing sites.
ASVAB CEP test results are sent to students’ schools so they can explore career options with counselors. The scores show how well the student did on each subject, and how they compare with others who took the test. There are three composite scores in Verbal, Math, and Science and Technical skills, and the Armed Forces Qualification Test (AFQT) score is also reported.
Military law introduces offences not recognised by civilian courts, such as absence without leave (AWOL), desertion, political acts, malingering, behaving disrespectfully, and disobedience (see, for example, Offences against military law in the United Kingdom).[23] Penalties range from a summary reprimand to imprisonment for several years following a court martial.[23] Certain fundamental rights are also restricted or suspended, including the freedom of association (e.g. union organizing) and freedom of speech (speaking to the media).[23] Military personnel in some countries have a right of conscientious objection if they believe an order is immoral or unlawful, or cannot in good conscience carry it out.

If you're looking for more information on the ASVAB, we've also written extensive articles about the test to help you feel confident on test day. Read through these informational ASVAB resources at any time to learn more about the purpose of the ASVAB, important concepts related to ASVAB qualification requirements, passing scores, registration process, test-taking strategies and much more.
This is a private website that is not affiliated with the U.S. government, U.S. Armed Forces, or Department of Veterans Affairs. U.S. government agencies have not reviewed this information. This site is not connected with any government agency. If you would like to find more information about benefits offered by the U.S. Department of Veteran’s Affairs, please visit the official U.S. government web site for veterans benefits at http://www.va.gov.

If you’re planning on using your scores for military enlistment, you may be hoping to achieve a score that is high enough for a specific signing bonus. While it’s natural to want to do your best, putting extra pressure on yourself can cause unnecessary anxiety. Take a few deep breaths, relax, and remember that taking the test is only part of the entire recruitment process.
In the 1950s, the military adopted a single exam known as the Armed Forces Qualification Test (AFQT). Used as a screening tool, the AFQT measured a recruit’s ability to absorb military training and their future potential. It was supplemented by service-specific battery tests for the purposes of MOS classification. In 1972, the Department of Defense determined that all services should use one exam for screening and assigning individuals to an MOS. The AFQT was phased out over a two-year period in favor of the current Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB) test.
There are 65 MEP joint services locations across all 52 states and in Puerto Rico. If you do not live close enough to a MEP, your recruiter will advise you to take the test at one of the MET sites which are located in many Federal government buildings, armories and Reserve stations. With multiple locations across the country to choose from, you won’t have to travel far to take this all-important first step toward a military career.
As an adjective, military originally referred only to soldiers and soldiering, but it soon broadened to apply to land forces in general, and anything to do with their profession.[2] The names of both the Royal Military Academy (1741) and United States Military Academy (1802) reflect this. However, at about the time of the Napoleonic Wars, 'military' began to be used in reference to armed forces as a whole,[2] and in the 21st century expressions like 'military service', 'military intelligence', and 'military history' encompass naval and air force aspects. As such, it now connotes any activity performed by armed force personnel.

Our ASVAB practice test questions are categorized to help you focus your study. Just like in the real exam, each of our questions will have four possible answers to choose from. The questions are similar to what you can expect on the actual ASVAB exam. After you submit answers to the practice questions, a test score will be presented. In addition, you will be given rationales (explanations) to all of the questions to help you understand any questions you may have gotten wrong.
This is a private website that is not affiliated with the U.S. government, U.S. Armed Forces, or Department of Veterans Affairs. U.S. government agencies have not reviewed this information. This site is not connected with any government agency. If you would like to find more information about benefits offered by the U.S. Department of Veteran’s Affairs, please visit the official U.S. government web site for veterans benefits at http://www.va.gov.
Paragraph Comprehension tests the ability to obtain information from written material. Students read different types of passages of varying lengths and respond to questions based on information presented in each passage. Concepts include identifying stated and reworded facts, determining a sequence of events, drawing conclusions, identifying main ideas, determining the author's purpose and tone, and identifying style and technique.
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