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The profession of soldiering as part of a military is older than recorded history itself. Some of the most enduring images of the classical antiquity portray the power and feats of its military leaders. The Battle of Kadesh in 1274 BC was one of the defining points of Pharaoh Ramses II's reign, and is celebrated in bas-relief on his monuments. A thousand years later, the first emperor of unified China, Qin Shi Huang, was so determined to impress the gods with his military might, he was buried with an army of terracotta soldiers.[1] The Romans were dedicated to military matters, leaving to posterity many treatises and writings, as well as a large number of lavishly carved triumphal arches and victory columns.
There is another ASVAB score that's equally important, if not more so, because it is the score that determines if a person is eligible for military service. It's the Armed Forces Qualification Test score, or AFQT score. This score is calculated from only four of the nine Standard Scores on the ASVAB - Arithmetic Reasoning (AR), Mathematics Knowledge (MK), Paragraph Comprehension (PC), and Word Knowledge (WK). First, the WK and PC scores are added together, then the sum is doubled. This is known as the Verbal Expression (VE) score. The VE, MK, and AR scores are then added together, and the sum is the AFQT. This score is a straight percentile measure, expressed as a number from 1-99. The number is the percentage of people who scored lower than the test taker. For example, if a person receives an AFQT score of 63, that means that he did better on the test than 63% of the people who have taken it.
After World War II, with the onset of the Cold War, the constant technological development of new weapons was institutionalised, as participants engaged in a constant 'arms race' in capability development. This constant state of weapons development continues into the present, and remains a constant drain on national resources, which some[who?] blame on the military-industrial complex.
The operational level is at a scale bigger than one where line of sight and the time of day are important, and smaller than the strategic level, where production and politics are considerations. Formations are of the operational level if they are able to conduct operations on their own, and are of sufficient size to be directly handled or have a significant impact at the strategic level. This concept was pioneered by the German army prior to and during the Second World War. At this level, planning and duration of activities takes from one week to a month, and are executed by Field Armies and Army Corps and their naval and air equivalents.[31]
What you'll learn: Cell biology, division and operations; genetics; evolution; plant and animal biology; nutrition; human anatomy and physiology; ecology; matter, atomic structure, the periodic table, and chemical reactions; measurement; nuclear chemistry; motion, force, energy, and work; fluids; waves and sound; and geology, meteorology, oceanography, and astronomy

In the 2000s, women can serve on U.S. combat ships, including in command roles. They are permitted to serve on submarines.[39] Women can fly military aircraft and make up 2% of all pilots in the U.S. Military. In 2003, Major Kim Campbell was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross for landing her combat damaged A-10 Thunderbolt II with no hydraulic control and only one functional engine after being struck by hostile fire over Baghdad.
SOC is a consortium of more than 1550 colleges and universities that provide educational opportunities for servicemembers and their families. It is co-sponsored by the American Association of State Colleges and Universities (AASCU) and the American Association of Community Colleges (AACC) and managed for the DoD by the Defense Activity for Non-Traditional Education Support (DANTES). Course work can be done on campus, at military installations and armories, and at a distance by computer or correspondence. Associate, bachelor, and graduate-level degree programs are available. Special curriculum areas include SOCAD (Army), SOCNAV (Navy), SOCMAR (Marines), and SOCGuard (Army National Guard). In addition, SOC operates ConAP (Concurrent Admissions Program) to increase college enrollment of Army enlistees (Army and Army Reserves). ConAP allows you to enlist in the Army at the same time as you apply for college. DANTES also operates its own Distance Learning Program. For more information, contact:
PiCAT testing does require a shorter “verification test” for new recruits. This is in the form of a short, proctored test that lasts about a half an hour. Depending on circumstances, recruits may be required to take this verification test at a Military Entrance Processing Station, or within 30 days of taking PiCAT if the recruit is not going to MEPS right away. Those who do not pass the verification test will be required to take the ASVAB.

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AFQT scores are reported as percentiles between 1-99. An AFQT percentile score indicates the percentage of examinees in a reference group that scored at or below that particular score. For current AFQT scores, the reference group is a sample of 18 to 23 year old youth who took the ASVAB as part of a national study conducted in 1997. Thus, an AFQT score of 95 indicates that the examinee scored as well as or better than 95% of the nationally-representative sample of 18 to 23 year olds. An AFQT score of 60 indicates that the examinee scored as well as or better than 60% of the nationally-representative sample.
Under the Montgomery GI Bill, the Army, Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps and Coast Guard (and their Reserves and the National Guard) provide a cash education incentive to encourage you to join and serve a tour of duty. The Montgomery GI Bill (MGIB) provides up to 36 months of education benefits to eligible veterans for college, business, technical or vocational courses, correspondence courses, apprenticeship/job training and flight training. MGIB benefits may be used while on active duty or after a fully honorable discharge from active duty.
Each branch of the service operates its own Service Academy as a four-year institution of higher education. All students receive a full scholarship with a small monthly stipend. Upon graduation, you're commissioned as a second lieutenant in the Army, Air Force, or Marine Corps or as an ensign in the Navy or Coast Guard. Appointment to a service academy is extremely competitive. For more information, call 1-800-822-8762 (US Military Academy in West Point, New York), 1-800-638-9156 (US Naval Academy in Annapolis, Maryland), 1-800-443-9266 (US Air Force Academy in Colorado Springs, Colorado), 1-800-883-8724 (US Coast Guard Academy in New London, Connecticut), and 1-866-546-4778 (United States Merchant Marine Academy, Kings Point, New York).
The military offers boundless opportunities for people looking for a career in serving their country. The five branches of the military (Army, Navy, Marine Corps, Air Force, and Coast Guard) all have active, reserve, and guard units with jobs unique to each branch and level of commitment. Examples of different jobs include military police, telephone technician, psychological operations specialist, journalist, dental specialist, and oboe player. Each job allows for different levels of advancement depending on factors such as job performance and length of service.
This study guide offers in-depth preparation for all areas of the Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB). Each lesson comes with a fun, informative video to help you get up to speed on the same subjects the ASVAB will test you on. As you review each lesson, try the accompanying self-assessment quizzes to reinforce your understanding of the material. You can also access the course at any time using your computer or mobile device.
These scores include your Armed Forces Qualification Test (AFQT) score as well as your scores on each of the 9 individual subtests that make up the ASVAB.  When you get your report, the most important score you will want to look for first is your AFQT score.  This score determines your eligibility to serve in the military and to enlist in the U.S. Marines you need to have achieved a score of at least 32.
The Word Knowledge section of the test gauges your ability to recognize the meaning of words both individually and when used in a sentence. A question may be phrased as, “‘Antagonize’ most nearly means: embarrass, struggle, provoke, or worship.” Because there are so many words in the English language, you may find it difficult to study the specific words on the test. However, striving to improve your language and vocabulary usage with a practice test like this one can help you not only in preparing for the ASVAB test but also in your career and personal life. The CAT-ASVAB test has 16 questions in 8 minutes, while the paper-and-pencil version has 35 questions in 11 minutes.
The AFQT is not a separate test but is the collection of scores from these four sections of the ASVAB. Due to the fact that the AFQT scores determine the eligibility for enlistment into the military, it is important to score as well as possible. This site is designed to provide candidates that are taking the ASVAB with additional opportunities to practice questions in preparation for the types of questions they will receive within the official AFQT test sections. We provide sample practice questions across all four sections, including a score at the end of the practice exam so you can check your performance.

There are 65 MEP joint services locations across all 52 states and in Puerto Rico. If you do not live close enough to a MEP, your recruiter will advise you to take the test at one of the MET sites which are located in many Federal government buildings, armories and Reserve stations. With multiple locations across the country to choose from, you won’t have to travel far to take this all-important first step toward a military career.
If you are enlisting in the military, good - a patriotic journey, where you can build skills and see the world. However there is one thing your recruiter didn't tell you. Your ability to get into a department that you want, depends on how well you can take a quiz - just like you did with the SAT, or whatever those test are called in current times. Those test asked those really stupid questions about the cost of ice cream if a train leaves New York at 4:00 and it is 20 degrees on Colorado. This book will teach you how to answer those ridiculous questions that WILL control your destiny. Get a copy and memorize it... then serving your country will lead to a great career.
Note: While the U.S. Navy is older than the Marine Corps,[52] the Marine Corps takes precedence due to previous inconsistencies in the Navy's birth date. The Marine Corps has recognized its observed birth date on a more consistent basis. The Second Continental Congress is considered to have established the Navy on 13 October 1775 by authorizing the purchase of ships, but did not actually pass the "Rules for the Regulation of the Navy of the United Colonies" until 27 November 1775.[53] The Marine Corps was established by act of said Congress on 10 November 1775. The Navy did not officially recognize 13 October 1775 as its birth date until 1972, when then–Chief of Naval Operations Admiral Elmo Zumwalt authorized it to be observed as such.[52]
Limited Duty Officer: due to the highly technical nature of some officer billets, the Marine Corps, Navy and Coast Guard employ a system of promoting proven senior enlisted members to the ranks of commissioned officers. They fill a need that is similar to, but distinct from that filled by warrant officers (to the point where their accession is through the same school). While warrant officers remain technical experts, LDOs take on the role of a generalist, like that of officers commissioned through more traditional sources. LDOs are limited, not by their authority, but by the types of billets they are allowed to fill. However, in recent times they have come to be used more and more like their more-traditional counterparts.
The rapid growth of movable type in the late 16th century and early 17th century saw an upsurge in private publication. Political pamphlets became popular, often lampooning military leaders for political purposes. A pamphlet directed against Prince Rupert of the Rhine is a typical example. During the 19th century, irreverence towards authority was at its height, and for every elegant military gentleman painted by the master-portraitists of the European courts, for example, Gainsborough, Goya, and Reynolds, there are the sometimes affectionate and sometimes savage caricatures of Rowland and Hogarth.

The remaining six sections on the ASVAB are used to drill down and determine what job you are best suited for in the military as these scores will provide in-depth insight into your knowledge, skills and interests. These six sections are: General Science (GS), Mechanical Comprehension (MC), Electronics Information (EI), and Assembling Objects (AO), Auto Information (AI) & Shop Information (SI). Please note: AI and SI are combined into one single score (labeled AS) on the paper and pencil test.
The SAT requires training of the mind. More specifically it requires one to be able to pick up on context clues, make valid assumptions, and express concrete facts. This is why millions of students study intensely before they jump right into the test. Imagine if another area was added onto that same test. The person studying for that test would then need to study even harder. That is the logic that should be put forth when preparing for the ASVAB. It requires that a person expresses the previously mentioned skills while adding the verbal/physical aspects. The question becomes “How does one prepare themselves for this rigorous test?”
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