These forces demobilized in 1784 after the Treaty of Paris ended the War for Independence. The Congress of the Confederation created the current United States Army on 3 June 1784. The United States Congress created the current United States Navy on 27 March 1794 and the current United States Marine Corps on 11 July 1798. All three services trace their origins to their respective Continental predecessors. The 1787 adoption of the Constitution gave the Congress the power to "raise and support armies", to "provide and maintain a navy" and to "make rules for the government and regulation of the land and naval forces", as well as the power to declare war. The President is the U.S. Armed Forces' commander-in-chief.
As in most militaries, members of the U.S. Armed Forces hold a rank, either that of officer, warrant officer or enlisted, to determine seniority and eligibility for promotion. Those who have served are known as veterans. Rank names may be different between services, but they are matched to each other by their corresponding paygrade.[23] Officers who hold the same rank or paygrade are distinguished by their date of rank to determine seniority, while officers who serve in certain positions of office of importance set by law, outrank all other officers in active duty of the same rank and paygrade, regardless of their date of rank.[24] In 2012, it was reported that only one in four persons in the United States of the proper age meet the moral, academic and physical standards for military service.[25]
For those who are interested in enlisting in the military, they are screened using the Armed Forces Qualification Test (AFQT), which is comprised of a subset of scores from the ASVAB. Successfully passing the AFQT is not the sole requirement for enlisting but is one of the qualifications that must be met. There are various requirements for the different branches of the military and those interested are encouraged to contact recruiters to obtain more information about requirements specific to that branch.
In addition to the AFQT, the military also includes additional composite scores, often called 'line scores.' These scores are based on variations of the ASVAB's ten subtests and are required for certain military careers. For example, an Army Clerical (CL) score is determined by looking at an individual's Word Knowledge (WK), Paragraph Comprehension (PC), Arithmetic Reasoning (AR) and Mathematics Knowledge (MK) scores. Note that the subtests considered for different careers can vary depending on the military branch.
In broad usage, the terms "armed forces" and "military" are often treated as synonymous, although in technical usage a distinction is sometimes made in which a country's armed forces may include both its military and other paramilitary forces. Armed force is the use of armed forces to achieve political objectives. There are various forms of irregular military forces, not belonging to a recognized state; though they share many attributes with regular military forces, they are less often referred to as simply "military".
The military offers boundless opportunities for people looking for a career in serving their country. The five branches of the military (Army, Navy, Marine Corps, Air Force, and Coast Guard) all have active, reserve, and guard units with jobs unique to each branch and level of commitment. Examples of different jobs include military police, telephone technician, psychological operations specialist, journalist, dental specialist, and oboe player. Each job allows for different levels of advancement depending on factors such as job performance and length of service.
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