Extra back-to-basics practice that has helped thousands of recruits to qualify for the armed forces. Thousands of military recruits need extra help to pass the ASVAB, or Armed Forces Test and here’s where they can find it! ARCO’s ASVAB Basics offers intensive practice in reading, vocabulary, and mathematics the subjects covered in the four ASVAB subtests that determine whether a recruit qualifies for enlistment. Now updated, it features: * Full-length ASVAB subtests for practice * Drills to improve basic academic skills * Complete explanatory answers.

A graphic view of the increasing trend in AFQT performance of accessions from FY 1981 through FY 1992 is provided in Figure 2.8. The more significant gains were in Categories I to IIIA, where the percentages increased from 47 percent in FY 1981 to 75 percent in FY 1992. Conversely, there has been a steady decline in the percentage of Category IIIB accessions. Most dramatic has been the decrease in accessions who score in Category IV—from 33 percent in FY 1979 to one percent or less since FY 1991. There has been a gradual decline in the percentage of accessions in Categories I to IIIA in the last seven years, from 75 to 65 percent.
We hope you find our study guides useful as you begin preparing to take the ASVAB! If you’re social like we are, please reach out to us on Facebook, Twitter, Google+, and Pinterest. We’d love to answer your questions, get your feedback, or just hear more about your thoughts on the ASVAB or your intended branch of service. Good luck studying and congrats as you take this exciting first step towards your military career!
Personnel may be recruited or conscripted, depending on the system chosen by the state. Most military personnel are males; the minority proportion of female personnel varyies internationally (approximately 3% in India,[8] 10% in the UK,[9] 13% in Sweden,[10] 16% in the US,[11] and 27% in South Africa[12]). While two-thirds of states now recruit or conscript only adults, as of 2017 50 states still relied partly on children under the age of 18 (usually aged 16 or 17) to staff their armed forces.[13]
Another big advantage of practice tests is that they are fun. It’s fun to challenge yourself and see what you know. Instead of wondering if you are studying the right things or just wasting your valuable time, good practice tests can help you find out what you need to know while injecting your study time with excitement and competition as you try to outdo yourself each time you take a test.
Law prohibits applicants in Category V from enlisting.[6] In addition, there are constraints placed on Category IV recruits; recruits in Category IV must be high school diploma graduates but cannot be denied enlistment solely on this criteria if the recruit is needed to satisfy established strength requirements. Furthermore, the law constrains the percentage of accessions who can fall between Categories IV-V (currently, the limit is 20% of all persons originally enlisted in a given armed force in a given fiscal year).[6]
The results of each test are shown as soon as you complete it. You’ll see what you got right and how it compares to other people who took the same test. Feedback is also visual, showing your percentile and success on each question compared to others. The answers to each ASVAB practice test question are explained as well. The free ASVAB example questions are both tools for learning and for comparing your results to your own previous attempts, and to the scores of your classmates and peers. You can use the scores as a baseline and to identify your weaknesses. With this information, it becomes easier to focus your study time and effort on areas that need improvement.

A lot of people see the “CAT” term attached to the ASVAB test when they first start looking into the test and aren’t sure what that stands for. This term is an acronym and it stands for “Computerized Adaptive Test”. There are three different versions of the ASVAB test. The CAT is available at military processing stations for enlisting soldiers. The pencil and paper (also known as the P&P or S-ASVAB) version of the test is available for high school and college students who may not actually enlist. The third type of ASVAB test is the MET-ASVAB, or Mobile Examination Test, which is available only for enlisted soldiers at mobile testing centers (this test is also done with paper and pencil).
The military organization is characterized by a strict hierarchy divided by military rank, with ranks normally grouped (in descending order of authority) as officers (e.g. Colonel), non-commissioned officers (e.g. Sergeant), and personnel at the lowest rank (e.g. Private Soldier). While senior officers make strategic decisions, subordinated military personnel (soldiers, sailors, marines, or airmen) fulfil them. Although rank titles vary by military branch and country, the rank hierarchy is common to all state armed forces worldwide.
With only a minute or two to answer each question, this part of the test might seem a little intimidating. But if you know how to approach the questions in this section, you should have no trouble at all. It’s well worth your time to take our practice tests, using the same logical steps to solve each problem until they become second nature. To solve these word problems, you will need to:
If you're looking for more information on the ASVAB, we've also written extensive articles about the test to help you feel confident on test day. Read through these informational ASVAB resources at any time to learn more about the purpose of the ASVAB, important concepts related to ASVAB qualification requirements, passing scores, registration process, test-taking strategies and much more.

The majority of people who complete the exam have little intention of entering the military. However, it’s important to keep in mind that the United States military is actually one of the nation’s largest employers. If you’re undecided about your future after high school graduation, taking the test can give you a better picture of your options in both civilian and military life.

The Mathematics Knowledge section of the exam measures your knowledge of various math areas, such as algebra and geometry. You may be asked to find the square root of a number or the volume of a brick with given dimensions. Algebraic problems may require finding the value of “y” in a given equation. A review of math symbols—such as ≠, ≤, and √—can help you solve the given problems much faster, and using our ASVAB math study guide to practice answering the algebra and geometry questions on the test can help increase your overall AFQT score. The CAT-ASVAB has 16 questions in 20 minutes; the paper-and-pencil version has 25 questions in 24 minutes.
NEW! - Utilize these flashcards to help you learn and remember the most important terms you will find on your ASVAB Word Knowledge test.  Navigate through the flashcards by clicking next and previous.  You can press Flip to see the definitions.  If you got the definition correct, mark it "correct" - otherwise mark it incorrect.  When you get through all of the flashcards, you will be given the option to review all the cards, or just the ones you marked incorrect. Good luck!
If school district or open-enrollment charter school has entered into a prior contract under which a vocational aptitude test that does not comply with the requirements for an alternative test outlined above, then the school district, open-enrollment charter school, or high school may elect not to provide the ASVAB for the term of the contract. On the expiration of the contract term, the requirements outlined in this letter become applicable to the school district, open-enrollment charter school or high school.

Every single individual that wishes to serve this country is without a doubt a brave person that deserves respect. These practice tests are offered because everyone wants to see these soldiers follow their dreams. Additionally, the nation as a whole firmly believe that those honorable individuals should not be held back because of their inability to recall some pieces of information. This nation does not just dream about making a difference.

What is the military? In simple terms, the U.S. Armed Forces are made up of the five armed service branches: Air Force, Army, Coast Guard, Marine Corps, and Navy. There are three general categories of military people: active duty (full-time soldiers and sailors), reserve & guard forces (usually work a civilian job, but can be called to full-time military duty), and veterans and retirees (past members of the military). And of course there are the millions of family members and friends of military members, past and present. But you're here to learn more about the military. There is much to learn! So first the basics. Exactly who is in charge?


A military brat is a colloquial term for a child with at least one parent who served as an active duty member (vice reserve) in the armed forces. Children of armed forces members may move around to different military bases or international postings, which gives them a childhood differing from the norm. Unlike common usage of the term brat, when it is used in this context, it is not necessarily a derogatory term.
In the 1950s, the military adopted a single exam known as the Armed Forces Qualification Test (AFQT). Used as a screening tool, the AFQT measured a recruit’s ability to absorb military training and their future potential. It was supplemented by service-specific battery tests for the purposes of MOS classification. In 1972, the Department of Defense determined that all services should use one exam for screening and assigning individuals to an MOS. The AFQT was phased out over a two-year period in favor of the current Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB) test.
One set of ASVAB scores – Career Exploration Scores – tells you your current strengths in verbal, math, science, and technical skills.  The scores allow you to compare your test performance with that of other students at your grade level and can help you determine your readiness for further education and training in different career areas.  You will also receive a Military Entrance Score that is important for entry into the Armed Services.  You can discuss your score with a military recruiter.
The Armed Forces Qualification Test (AFQT) covers four sections from the Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB): Word Knowledge, Paragraph Comprehension, Arithmetic Reasoning, and Mathematics Knowledge. These four sections and your scores on them make up the Military Entrance Score, also known as the AFQT. Your AFQT score is used to determine your eligibility for entrance into the Armed Services.
Mathematics Knowledge tests the ability to solve problems by applying knowledge of mathematical concepts and applications. The problems focus on concepts and algorithms, and involve number theory, numeration, algebraic operations and equations, geometry, measurement and probability. Mathematics Knowledge is one factor that characterizes mathematics comprehension; it also assesses logical thinking.
The Auto and Shop Information section of the ASVAB test measures your knowledge of automobile technology and basic repairs. The shop questions are about basic wood and metals. For example, you will encounter questions such as “Shock absorbers on a car connect the axle to the: wheel, chassis, drive shaft, or exhaust pipe?” You may be asked what sanding blocks are used for, followed by the following choices: preventing high spots and ridges on sanded surfaces, preventing dirt from collecting on the sandpaper, stretching the length of sandpaper, or prolonging the use of the sandpaper. The CAT-ASVAB test has two parts: the first part covering automotive material asks 11 questions in 7 minutes; the 11 shop information questions are allotted 6 minutes. The paper-and-pencil version asks 25 questions in 11 minutes.
Military tactics concerns itself with the methods for engaging and defeating the enemy in direct combat. Military tactics are usually used by units over hours or days, and are focused on the specific, close proximity tasks and objectives of squadrons, companies, battalions, regiments, brigades, and divisions, and their naval and air force equivalents.[31]
The Woman's Army Auxiliary Corps was established in the United States in 1942. Women saw combat during World War II, first as nurses in the Pearl Harbor attacks on 7 December 1941. The Woman's Naval Reserve, Marine Corps Women's Reserve and Women Airforce Service Pilots (WASPs) were also created during this conflict. In 1944, WACs arrived in the Pacific and landed in Normandy on D-Day. During the war, 67 Army nurses and 16 Navy nurses were captured and spent three years as Japanese prisoners of war. There were 350,000 American women who served during World War II and 16 were killed in action. In total, they gained over 1,500 medals, citations and commendations. Virginia Hall, serving with the Office of Strategic Services, received the second-highest U.S. combat award, the Distinguished Service Cross, for action behind enemy lines in France.
The best way to answer questions in this section is to read each paragraph twice before you answer. First, read it quickly to get the main idea. Next, read it again, paying more attention to the details that relate to the main point. Then, read all of the questions and refer back to the paragraph to help you choose the best answer. If you take this approach, you will be more relaxed and efficient, and less likely to get thrown off the track by being nervous.

The AFQT is often mistakenly called the “overall ASVAB score.” You commonly hear someone say, “I got a 67 on the ASVAB,” or “My ASVAB score was 92.” That’s not correct; it implies that the AFQT is derived from all nine subtests of the ASVAB, and it’s not. The AFQT score is computed from just four of the ASVAB subtests that measure your math and communicative ability.
The other written test format is the Student ASVAB which is given at high schools, vocational schools, or colleges. This test lasts approximately three hours. The Written Arithmetic Reasoning subtest of the ASVAB consists of 30 multiple choice questions, which must be answered in 36 minutes. Below are a few sample questions which are very similar to the actual questions you'll see on the ASVAB:
Initially, recruits without higher education or college degrees will hold the pay grade of E-1 and will be elevated to E-2 usually soon after basic training. Different services have different incentive programs for enlistees, such as higher initial ranks for college credit, being an Eagle Scout and referring friends who go on to enlist as well. Participation in DEP is one way recruits can achieve rank before their departure to basic training.
Current deployments Conflicts Wars Timeline History: A MC N AF CG Colonial World War II Civil affairs Officers' clubs African Americans Asian Americans Buddhist Americans Jewish Americans Muslim Americans Pakistani Americans Sikh Americans Historiography: Army Center of Military History MC History Division Naval History and Heritage Command Air Force Historical Research Agency American official war artists: Army Art Program AF Art Program

Standard Scores are scores that have a fixed mean and standard deviation in the population of examinees. A Standard Score indicates how many units of the standard deviation a particular score is above or below the mean. In the case of the ASVAB subtests, the mean is set to 50 and the standard deviation is set to 10. Thus, a Standard Score of 40 indicates that the examinee scored 1 standard deviation below the mean. A Standard Score of 70 indicates that the examinee scored 2 standard deviations above the mean. To learn more about how standard scores are derived and used, click here.
The ASVAB currently contains 9 sections (except the written test, which contains 8 sections). The duration of each test varies from as low as ten minutes up to 36 minutes for Arithmetic Reasoning; the entire ASVAB is three hours long. The test is typically administered in a computerized format at Military Entrance Processing Stations, known as MEPS, or at a satellite location called a Military Entrance Test (MET) site. The ASVAB is administered by computer at the MEPS, while a written version is given at most MET sites. Testing procedures vary depending on the mode of administration.[3]
Welcome to ASVAB Practice Tests, a free website that is designed to help you with your ASVAB test prep and review. Each of our free ASVAB practice tests includes challenging practice questions along with detailed explanations. Whether you are preparing for a career in the Army, Navy, Air Force, or the Marines you will need to pass the ASVAB test. If you study for this test it will make a big difference in your final score. Get started now with our free ASVAB practice tests!
Welcome to ASVAB Practice Tests, a free website that is designed to help you with your ASVAB test prep and review. Each of our free ASVAB practice tests includes challenging practice questions along with detailed explanations. Whether you are preparing for a career in the Army, Navy, Air Force, or the Marines you will need to pass the ASVAB test. If you study for this test it will make a big difference in your final score. Get started now with our free ASVAB practice tests!
The questions that have a tendency to arise rather quickly are something along the lines of “why is this test so important?” and “What is the overall purpose of this test?” Well, first it is important to define the actual test and to assess the colorful history of the test. The Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery test (ASVAB) is a test that was officially formatted in 1968 with the intention of mentally preparing soldiers with knowledge that identifies with the following:
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