The military uses the verbal expression (VE) score to measure your communicative ability. The score goes toward computing the AFQT score as well as many of the military’s line scores. The military brass determine your VE score by first adding the value of your Word Knowledge (WK) raw score to your Paragraph Comprehension (PC) raw score. The result is then converted to a scaled score ranging from 20 to 62.
The test measures competency in 9 different subjects, which include General Science, Electronics Information, Auto and Shop Information, Mechanical Comprehension, Assembling Objects, Word Knowledge, Paragraph Comprehension, Arithmetic Reasoning, and Mathematics Knowledge. These last four sections- Word Knowledge, Paragraph Comprehension, Arithmetic Reasoning, and Mathematics Knowledge are the most important, as they make up something called the AFQT (Armed Forces Qualifications Test). An applicant’s AFQT score is what determines whether or not they are able to serve in the military at all, as each branch has minimum scores for enlistment.
The bonus disc alone makes this worth most of the price. The Hollywood High live songs (9 of them) are amazingly well recorded, very energetic great performance, with an enthusiastic crowd that doesn't intrude on the music. If you remember the live "El Mocambo" bonus disc that was part of an EC boxed set several years ago, well this is FAR better than that. The Hollywood High set alone could have been released as a great live CD, possibly the only reason it wasn't was because it would be seen as too short. The "bonus disc" here has other songs (B sides, etc.) not from the original "Armed Forces" which are worthy and interesting as well.

High school and postsecondary students can also take the ASVAB test as part of the Department of Defense’s Career Exploration Program. This paper-and-pencil version of the test is the same as the paper-and-pencil enlistment version but excludes the Assembling Objects section. It is intended to help those students considering a career in the military to discover their strengths in both military and civilian jobs. If the student scores high enough in the AFQT section of the test, he may use the score to enlist within the two-year expiration window.


As of 31 December 2010, U.S. Armed Forces troops were stationed in 150 countries; the number of non-contingent deployments per country ranges from 1 in Suriname to over 50,000 in Germany.[30] Some of the largest deployments are: 103,700 in Afghanistan, 52,440 in Germany (see list), 35,688 in Japan (USFJ), 28,500 in South Korea (USFK), 9,660 in Italy and 9,015 in the United Kingdom. These numbers change frequently due to the regular recall and deployment of units.
Figure 2.7 shows FY 1977 as the low point and FY 1992 as the high point in accessing recruits in Categories I to IIIA. In FY 1977, 34 percent of accessions scored in the top half of the AFQT distribution. Only 13 percent of Blacks, 19 percent of Hispanics, and 20 percent of "Others" scored in Categories I–IIIA. [3] Fifteen years later, in FY 1992, the majority of minority accessions achieved scores in the I–IIIA range (Blacks - 56 percent, Hispanics - 67 percent, "Others" - 67 percent). Hispanics have shown the most marked increase, with a 48-percentage-point gain in Category I to IIIA accessions from FY 1977 to FY 1992.

Although mostly concerned with the military transport, as a means of delivery using different modes of transport; from military trucks, to container ships operating from permanent military base, it also involves creating field supply dumps at the rear of the combat zone, and even forward supply points in specific unit's Tactical Area of Responsibility.
An important part of the military intelligence role is the military analysis performed to assess military capability of potential future aggressors, and provide combat modelling that helps to understand factors on which comparison of forces can be made. This helps to quantify and qualify such statements as: "China and India maintain the largest armed forces in the World" or that "the U.S. Military is considered to be the world's strongest".[29]
The way to prepare for this exam is study hard and then quiz yourself with plenty of practice ASVAB tests. Remember that the exam is identical for all branches, so an Army ASVAB practice test is exactly the same as an ASVAB practice test for the Navy. The most important components of the test are the ones that count towards the Armed Services Qualifications Test, or AFQT. These sections are Word Knowledge, Paragraph Comprehension, Arithmetic Reasoning, and Math Knowledge. For tips and strategies for success on these questions, be sure to review our article on ASVAB Test Prep.
One ASVAB sub-measure, the Armed Forces Qualification Test (AFQT)--which is just a separate analysis of the same tests that focuses only on four of the subtests--is also population-referenced, but its score from 1-99 is a percentile score. This means that if you score a 73, you scored as well as or higher than 73% of test-takers in the national sample.
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