The ASVAB test is administered to potential military recruits to help determine which branch of service and which military jobs they will be best suited for. It is not a test of intelligence and is administered only in English. The test consists of nine subjects: General Science, Arithmetic Reasoning, Word Knowledge, Paragraph Comprehension, Mathematics Knowledge, Electronics Information, Auto and Shop Information, Mechanical Comprehension, and Assembling Objects.
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The ASVAB test can be taken at your school or a MEPS (Military Entrance Processing Stations) or MET (Mobile Examination Test) sites.  When the ASVAB is administered at your school, it is usually part of the Student Testing Program or Career Exploration Program.  When the ASVAB is given at MEPS or MET sites, it is part of the Enlistment Testing Program.  The ASVAB test content is the same no matter where you take it, except that you will not have to take the Assembling Objects test if you take the test at your school (as part of the Student Testing Program).  When you take the test in the Student Testing Program you will receive three composite scores (Verbal Skills, Math Skills, and Science and Technical Skills).  When you take the ASVAB as part of the Enlistment Testing Program, you will receive an AFQT (Armed Forces Qualification Test) score and Service composite scores.  These scores are used for assigning your military job.


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You can’t just be a subject matter expert and write a study guide for us. You have to be a great test taker too.  When our writers read study material they don’t just see words, they see the questions that you have to answer. Questions jump off the page to them as they read and this is what makes them uniquely qualified to prepare you for your mission of acing the ASVAB/AFQT.

Tomando el ASVAB no le compromete a nada. Un reclutador militar puede ponerse en contacto con usted después de tomar el ASVAB . El ASVAB puede ayudar a determinar sus propios intereses y aptitudes , incluso si usted no está planeando entrar en el ejército o está indeciso . Le puede ayudar a elegir los cursos para la universidad y tomar sus decisiones de carrera personal .
The Auto and Shop Information section of the ASVAB test measures your knowledge of automobile technology and basic repairs. The shop questions are about basic wood and metals. For example, you will encounter questions such as “Shock absorbers on a car connect the axle to the: wheel, chassis, drive shaft, or exhaust pipe?” You may be asked what sanding blocks are used for, followed by the following choices: preventing high spots and ridges on sanded surfaces, preventing dirt from collecting on the sandpaper, stretching the length of sandpaper, or prolonging the use of the sandpaper. The CAT-ASVAB test has two parts: the first part covering automotive material asks 11 questions in 7 minutes; the 11 shop information questions are allotted 6 minutes. The paper-and-pencil version asks 25 questions in 11 minutes.
A lot of people see the “CAT” term attached to the ASVAB test when they first start looking into the test and aren’t sure what that stands for. This term is an acronym and it stands for “Computerized Adaptive Test”. There are three different versions of the ASVAB test. The CAT is available at military processing stations for enlisting soldiers. The pencil and paper (also known as the P&P or S-ASVAB) version of the test is available for high school and college students who may not actually enlist. The third type of ASVAB test is the MET-ASVAB, or Mobile Examination Test, which is available only for enlisted soldiers at mobile testing centers (this test is also done with paper and pencil).

The “For Dummies” guide to the ASVAB is a great place to start if you are starting from square one. Like the other books in the series, this book assumes you know nothing about any of the topics covered, which is helpful if you haven’t worked with, say, assembling items before, or perhaps anything other than basic math. One of the best perks of this book is the “cheat sheets” at the end of each subsection that provide an excellent overview of the topics and equations you’ll need to master to do well on that area. You’ll also find an in-depth guide to how the ASVAB is scored and what to expect once you’re in the test room on exam day. There are thousands of practice questions inside, as well as seven online practice exams.


The General Science section of the test covers earth, space, and physical and life sciences. Because science is such a vast and dynamic topic, focus your study on basic principles. This gives you a good foundation to work through any question that is asked of you. Typical questions may include: “Why is air less dense than water?” or “How do you convert Celsius temperature to Fahrenheit?” The CAT-ASVAB test asks 16 questions in 8 minutes, while the pencil-and-paper version asks 25 questions in 11 minutes.
Wanna join the military? Your first step is to take the ASVAB - the Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery. Your score on this important test helps determine your military career, so if you have a specific job in mind, you need the right score to make that happen. 2017/2018 ASVAB For Dummies offers an in-depth view of each of the ASVAB's nine subtests with plenty of practice questions, exercises, and strategies for boosting performance and scores in key areas. You'll benefit from proven study tips to help you pinpoint your strengths and weaknesses and hone your test-taking skills. 2017/2018 ASVAB For Dummies is your key to preparing to take the ASVAB and getting the score you need to get the job you want. Overviews and practice questions for all 9 subtests Six full ASVAB practice tests to perfect test-taking skills One AFQT practice test to assess enlistment eligibility 2017/2018 ASVAB For Dummies is a must-have book that provides you with the integral tools and information you need in order to score the military future of your dreams.
The test is part of the larger ASVAB Career Exploration Program. The Program uses the test to help students identify both their interests as well as their strengths in three skills areas (verbal, math, and science and technical skills). Based on a student's skill levels, information is provided about more than 400 occupations in order to enable students and parents to judge their potential success in areas that interest them the most. Schools that may be facing budget cuts or finding themselves with limited resources devoted to career counseling are encouraged to find out whether using the ASVAB Program would be useful, as the testing and career development services are free of charge.
Con miles de empleos diferentes para el personal alistado y oficiales, hay mucho que hacer en las Fuerzas Armadas. El programa de exploración de carreras del ASVAB (Examen de Aptitud Vocacional para las Fuerzas Armadas, por sus siglas en inglés) puede ayudar a los adultos jóvenes a identificar y explorar ocupaciones potencialmente satisfactorias y a desarrollar estrategias para alcanzar sus objetivos de carrera.
0-9 No entrenable El Congreso de los EE. UU. Ha indicado que los militares no pueden aceptar reclutas de la Categoría V o más del 4 por ciento de los reclutas de la Categoría IV. Si está en la Categoría IV, debe tener un diploma de escuela secundaria para ser elegible para el alistamiento. Aun así, si usted es de Categoría IV, sus posibilidades de alistamiento son pequeñas y, en su mayoría, limitadas a la Guardia Nacional del Ejército.
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A good score on the ASVAB is different than a minimum required score.  Each of the military branches will have their own minimum required scores (see below).  In practice, however, each branch will be more selective in their recruiting.  A score of 50 on the ASVAB implies that you scored as well or better than 50% of comparable test-takers.  Since ASVAB scores are used for many purposes (e.g., enlistment eligibility, military job placements, and career exploration), it is important that you score well on the ASVAB.  A score of 60 or better should be your minimum target.
For almost a century, the U.S. military has been a pioneer in the field of using aptitude tests to evaluate an individual’s potential for service. The organization also uses the test to determine aptitude for various military occupational specialties (MOS). The use of aptitude tests began during World War I. While the group-administered Army Alpha test measured verbal and numerical ability as well as general knowledge, the Army Beta test was used to evaluate illiterate, unschooled and non-English speaking volunteers and draftees. The Army and Navy General Classifications Tests replaced the Alpha and Beta tests as a means to measure cognitive ability during World War II. The results of these tests, as well as additional classification exams, were used to assign recruits to a particular MOS.
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