Con miles de empleos diferentes para el personal alistado y oficiales, hay mucho que hacer en las Fuerzas Armadas. El programa de exploración de carreras del ASVAB (Examen de Aptitud Vocacional para las Fuerzas Armadas, por sus siglas en inglés) puede ayudar a los adultos jóvenes a identificar y explorar ocupaciones potencialmente satisfactorias y a desarrollar estrategias para alcanzar sus objetivos de carrera.
I normally don't care to do this, but I kind of felt like I had to with the number of errors in this book. I was actually liking the way it was setup and the tests and everything. I did find an error or two, which I shrugged off, most books have them. I keep reading, to find more and more and more. The thing is these weren't spelling errors. In fact, I didn't find one spelling error in my studies with this book. They were all information type errors. I can remember at least six off the top of my head. For example, in one single paragraph you are told invertebrates have no spine while vertebrates have no spine...yeah it caught me off guard too. One example from the math section, i forget which one, tells you (correctly) that you need to put your answer under the tens place when finding the product of, say, ten times twenty after you have multiplied the first number. It would look something like this: (did my best with the formatting)
No importa lo duro que estudiar para el ASVAB, es probable que venir a través de una serie de preguntas en las que no tienen ni idea. Adivinar sabiamente, y usted puede ganar puntos extra en muchas subpruebas ASVAB. Si deja una pregunta en blanco, usted tiene la oportunidad 0 por ciento de hacerlo bien, pero si acierta, que tiene al menos una probabilidad del 25 por ciento. Aquí están algunas sugerencias rápidas sobre adivinanzas:
Great book I love the "dummies" series from the ones Ive read so far. It doesn't dance around all the silly intricate baloney but gets to the point quickly and concisely. I went to the book store to review other asvab book help test material and they seemed so long winded and I felt like I would eventually get lost on the page staring aimlessly at intricate details which after a while can become monotonous and confusing. My actual test is scheduled for next week, the practice tests seem to be very helpful but the real proof will be in the pudding... so I guess till the actual deed is done this is mostly speculation so I guess we'll see next week. Wish me luck! Thanks!

Waves are described in terms of their height, wave-length, and period. “Height” is the vertical distance between the high point of a wave crest and the low point of the adjacent trough. “Wave-length” is the distance from one crest to the next, and “period” is the time it takes two adjacent crests to pass a fixed point, such as the end of a pier. The mathematics of wave theories are usually concerned with relationships between these and related characteristics.
The scores from the other tests are used to determine what type of specialty you might be best suited for.  These "composite" scores (also known as line scores, MOS scores, or aptitude area scores) are calculated by adding together combinations of the different sub test standard scores. These composite scores are then used to determine which different military jobs (aka Military Occupational Specialties or MOS) may be the best fit for you.  Each branch of the military will have their own approach to these composite scores.
There is another ASVAB score that's equally important, if not more so, because it is the score that determines if a person is eligible for military service. It's the Armed Forces Qualification Test score, or AFQT score. This score is calculated from only four of the nine Standard Scores on the ASVAB - Arithmetic Reasoning (AR), Mathematics Knowledge (MK), Paragraph Comprehension (PC), and Word Knowledge (WK). First, the WK and PC scores are added together, then the sum is doubled. This is known as the Verbal Expression (VE) score. The VE, MK, and AR scores are then added together, and the sum is the AFQT. This score is a straight percentile measure, expressed as a number from 1-99. The number is the percentage of people who scored lower than the test taker. For example, if a person receives an AFQT score of 63, that means that he did better on the test than 63% of the people who have taken it.
The vast majority of people who take the CAT-ASVAB test finish it as the time constraints are not very aggressive. However, if a respondent isn’t able to finish in time, the remaining unanswered questions are scored as if the respondent had answered them randomly. This is obviously not an ideal way to finish up the test and most often results in even poorer scores.
I’ve been in for 2 years now. If reading this book makes you feel better taking the test then by all means buy it. I bought it a while back before I joined and never read it and got 53 average score. You might be thinking “wow what an idiot” but I assure you if you are going in under any sort of open contract whether it be mechanical, electrical, or whatever you could get a 100% and still get a job you never wanted in the first place digging ditches like myself. I work with people who got much higher and much lower asvab scores. If you want to join you don’t need an amazing asvab score, and it doesn’t really mean anything unless you need a certain score for the job you want (which you might not get). You’ll understand soon enough.
The content of the test has been clearly laid out, but there is still a ton of information concerning the actual place where the test is administered and the time that is allocated for each section. The computerized test is administered in a “military entrance processing station” (MEP) or a satellite region that is identified as a “military entrance tests site” (MET). The difference in the two locations is that the METs are the places that are responsible for administering the written test, while MEPs are the places that administer the computerized tests.
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