As a general rule of thumb, anything over an 85 on the ASVAB will qualify you for nearly any position in the armed forces. But there are slight breakdowns within each score. For example, in order to qualify for Surveillance and Communications (SC) in the Army, Word Knowledge, Paragraph Comprehension, Arithmetic Reasoning, Auto & Shop and Mechanical Comprehension all require high marks. Though scoring an 85 or above would guarantee you scored in a high enough percentile to qualify for SC.


Reading page after page of boring content can cause the strongest minds to wander. Taking practice tests are a great way to break up the monotony of studying. Taking a practice test challenges you and keeps you interested in the material. Then you can review your test results and go over the questions you got wrong committing the right answer to memory. It’s a great, streamlined way to learn.
The military offers boundless opportunities for people looking for a career in serving their country. The five branches of the military (Army, Navy, Marine Corps, Air Force, and Coast Guard) all have active, reserve, and guard units with jobs unique to each branch and level of commitment. Examples of different jobs include military police, telephone technician, psychological operations specialist, journalist, dental specialist, and oboe player. Each job allows for different levels of advancement depending on factors such as job performance and length of service.
Welcome to ASVAB Practice Tests, a free website that is designed to help you with your ASVAB test prep and review. Each of our free ASVAB practice tests includes challenging practice questions along with detailed explanations. Whether you are preparing for a career in the Army, Navy, Air Force, or the Marines you will need to pass the ASVAB test. If you study for this test it will make a big difference in your final score. Get started now with our free ASVAB practice tests!

No matter how hard you study for the ASVAB, you’ll likely come across a few questions where you don’t have a clue. Guess wisely, and you can score extra points on many ASVAB subtests. If you leave a question blank, you have a 0 percent chance of getting it right, but if you guess, you have at least a 25 percent chance. Here are a few quick pointers on guessing:


Después de hacer un poco de estudio adicional, tome el segundo examen de la práctica. Una vez más, tratar de reproducir las condiciones de prueba. Compruebe sus respuestas. Comparar sus puntuaciones en las puntuaciones de la primera prueba. ¿Ha mejorado? Si es así, seguir estudiando como lo has sido. Si no es así, reconsiderar la forma en que estás estudiando o si usted está dejando a un lado el tiempo suficiente para estudiar. Un consejero de la escuela o el maestro le puede dar indicaciones adicionales para el estudio. Continuar con la práctica de las próximas pruebas.
The SAT requires training of the mind. More specifically it requires one to be able to pick up on context clues, make valid assumptions, and express concrete facts. This is why millions of students study intensely before they jump right into the test. Imagine if another area was added onto that same test. The person studying for that test would then need to study even harder. That is the logic that should be put forth when preparing for the ASVAB. It requires that a person expresses the previously mentioned skills while adding the verbal/physical aspects. The question becomes “How does one prepare themselves for this rigorous test?”
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