ASVAB For Dummies, Premier Edition includes in-depth reviews of all nine test subjects with complete explanations for every question, proficiency exercises, and tips to help you pinpoint your weaknesses and hone your test-taking skills. This Premier Edition of our bestselling ASVAB test guide includes six full-length practice tests (two more than our standard edition) PLUS interactive vocabulary builder flashcards online. Online links (exclusive to the Premier Edition):

The ASVAB is a timed test that measures your skills in a number of different areas. You complete questions that reveal your skills in paragraph comprehension, word knowledge, arithmetic reasoning and mathematics knowledge. These are basic skills that you will need as a member of the U.S. military. The score you receive on the ASVAB is factored into your Armed Forces Qualifying Test (AFQT) score. This score is used to figure out whether you qualify to enlist in the armed services.


As a general rule of thumb, anything over an 85 on the ASVAB will qualify you for nearly any position in the armed forces. But there are slight breakdowns within each score. For example, in order to qualify for Surveillance and Communications (SC) in the Army, Word Knowledge, Paragraph Comprehension, Arithmetic Reasoning, Auto & Shop and Mechanical Comprehension all require high marks. Though scoring an 85 or above would guarantee you scored in a high enough percentile to qualify for SC.

Los resultados del examen ASVAB CEP  se envían a las escuelas de los estudiantes para que puedan explorar las opciones de carreras con asesores. Los puntajes muestran cómo le fue al estudiante en cada asignatura, y su comparación con otros que realizaron la prueba. Hay tres puntajes compuestos en habilidades verbales, matemáticas y científicas y técnicas, y también se muestra el puntaje de la AFQT (Prueba de Calificación de las Fuerzas Armadas, por sus siglas en inglés).
Your ASVAB scores determine what jobs you will qualify for in the military. But before you embarrass yourself in front of active duty service members, know that a job in the Army and the Marine Corps is called an MOS, which is an acronym for Military Occupational Specialty. In the Air Force, jobs are called AFSC – Air Force Specialty Code. In the Navy they are known as an NEC - Navy Enlisted Classification and the Coast Guard, jobs are called ratings, or rate for short.

Every single individual that goes through the enlistment process should excel both mentally and physically. That is the number one principle that has consistently inspired this nation to serve these brave and honorable individuals with unwavering efforts. Those efforts officially came to the forefront when the country as a whole decided to correct perhaps the most significant enlistment related problem (passing the Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery test). Countless hours of hard work and dedication are currently reflected by the top-of-the-line ASVAB practice tests that this nation offers.
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