This book is as straightforward as they come. You won’t get confused by how the chapters are organized because it’s written in a straightforward format that almost makes studying for hours upon hours seem like fun. Rather than filling extra pages with fluff, this book is organized by the concept so that it’s easy to follow. Lest you think you might get tricked by the test writers, come test day, this book also and provides helpful insider tips from people, who have already taken the test to help you avoid common pitfalls. The guide includes hundreds of sample questions covering every topic you might encounter in the exam, as well as one full-length practice test. Some people might feel like the fluff-free style doesn’t have all of the information needed to feel 110 percent confident test day, so you might want to purchase another guide or two to supplement this one if you’re feeling nervous.
The ASVAB is a series of timed aptitude tests that are used to classify selected candidates into appropriate job roles as well as ultimately decide the eligibility of candidates for US military service.  In other words, perform poorly on this test and you could severely limit your opportunities in the military or even prevent yourself from serving.
Reading page after page of boring content can cause the strongest minds to wander. Taking practice tests are a great way to break up the monotony of studying. Taking a practice test challenges you and keeps you interested in the material. Then you can review your test results and go over the questions you got wrong committing the right answer to memory. It’s a great, streamlined way to learn.
We took the diagnostic tests (all of them) and found so many errors it was appalling. For many of the arithmetic reasoning questions, the correct answer is not even listed, and when you look at the answer explanations, they are very odd. One told me that from 6:30 am to 11:15 am is five hours. Last time I checked, that's 4 hours and 45 minutes. The paragraph comprehension sections always have issues, and the word knowledge is ridiculous.

The various armed forces adopted all of those aspects in 1976. At that point in time, the test was in its written form rather than today’s more common form (computerized test format). The written form covers all of the previously mentioned areas as well, which is why both forms are still available. All-in-all that answers the question concerning the intention of the test.

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