Our company's name is Mometrix Test Preparation, and we have a team of standardized test researchers who have worked on developing our study guide for the AFQT. The standards for who gets to work on the team are very strict- we demand the best for our customers, and only those who met our exacting standards made the cut. The dedicated research staff have years of combined experience in mastering the content and skills necessary to succeed on the toughest exams.
I thought I was just buying an extra book, that I would most likely not put attention to. But, it was not. This book is filled with practice questions, which I got to study before hand thanks to the "2015 / 2016 ASVAB For Dummies". These two books makes a great combination. One to study and the other to test how far you have improved by testing yourself. I am glad I bought it. I recommend it to everyone who is thinking of taking the ASVAB or the AFQT. Just have in mind, that this book is all about questions, of course it will give you the correct answer in the back of it, but it will not go into detail as much as the "2015 / 2016 ASVAB For Dummies" book.
The ASVAB currently contains 9 sections (except the written test, which contains 8 sections). The duration of each test varies from as low as ten minutes up to 36 minutes for Arithmetic Reasoning; the entire ASVAB is three hours long. The test is typically administered in a computerized format at Military Entrance Processing Stations, known as MEPS, or at a satellite location called a Military Entrance Test (MET) site. The ASVAB is administered by computer at the MEPS, while a written version is given at most MET sites. Testing procedures vary depending on the mode of administration.[3]

This continued in the 19th century, with publications like Punch in the British Empire and Le Père Duchesne in France, poking fun at the military establishment. This extended to media other print also. An enduring example is the Major-General's Song from the Gilbert and Sullivan light opera, The Pirates of Penzance, where a senior army officer is satirised for his enormous fund of irrelevant knowledge.
The U.S. Armed Forces are one of the largest militaries in terms of the number of personnel. It draws its personnel from a large pool of paid volunteers. Although conscription has been used in the past in various times of both war and peace, it has not been used since 1972, but the Selective Service System retains the power to conscript males, and requires that all male citizens and residents residing in the U.S. between the ages of 18–25 register with the service.[11]

While you may want to get the ASVAB over with, it is important to give yourself enough time to prepare and practice for the ASVAB. Once you take the test you will have to wait 30 days before you are eligible to re-take the test if you got a non-passing score, or if you want a better grade. After you retake the test twice, you will need to wait for a 6 month time period before being able to take the test again. For this reason, it is important to pick an ASVAB test date that gives you plenty of time to practice and prepare for each section of the test.

The Mathematics Knowledge section of the exam measures your knowledge of various math areas, such as algebra and geometry. You may be asked to find the square root of a number or the volume of a brick with given dimensions. Algebraic problems may require finding the value of “y” in a given equation. A review of math symbols—such as ≠, ≤, and √—can help you solve the given problems much faster, and using our ASVAB math study guide to practice answering the algebra and geometry questions on the test can help increase your overall AFQT score. The CAT-ASVAB has 16 questions in 20 minutes; the paper-and-pencil version has 25 questions in 24 minutes.

Doing poorly on the ASVAB might mean missing out on the military job that you really want- and maybe not getting in the military at all. If you’re stressed about taking the ASVAB, don’t worry- we’ve got you covered! Our free study guides for the ASVAB will give you an overview of the concepts you need to know and will help you pinpoint the areas you should spend your time studying. From Arithmetic Reasoning to Word Knowledge and every subject in between, our study guides for the ASVAB will help you get the ASVAB score that you need!
A good score on the ASVAB is different than a minimum required score.  Each of the military branches will have their own minimum required scores (see below).  In practice, however, each branch will be more selective in their recruiting.  A score of 50 on the ASVAB implies that you scored as well or better than 50% of comparable test-takers.  Since ASVAB scores are used for many purposes (e.g., enlistment eligibility, military job placements, and career exploration), it is important that you score well on the ASVAB.  A score of 60 or better should be your minimum target.
In exchange for a service commitment, the Reserve Officers' Training Corps (ROTC) program provides you with money for college while you're in school. You must take one military science course along with your other college courses and, upon graduation, enter the service as a commissioned officer. (There is no military commitment for the first year in ROTC, allowing you to pursue ROTC on a trial basis to see if ROTC is for you.) Full ROTC scholarships pay for almost all tuition, fees and books charges for four years of college. ROTC scholarships also come in one, two and three-year lengths. For more information, call 1-800-USA-ROTC (Army), 1-800-USA-NAVY (Navy), 1-866-423-7682 (Air Force) and 1-800-MARINES (Marines).

Tests are administered at participating schools. Neither schools nor students incur any costs for taking the ASVAB or using the Career Exploration Program. A test administrator is provided for every testing session and that person has no additional recruitment responsibilities. Various accommodations are available for the ASVAB, such as having questions read aloud, providing extra time, and other accommodations. School staff members are responsible, however, for tests that are administered with accommodations because test administrators are only able to administer the ASVAB by following the standardized procedure. If the test is being used for enlisting, only scores obtained during standardized test sessions (with no accommodations) can be used.
The ASVAB is routinely reviewed to eliminate any potential biases from questions and scoring. The exam underwent a major revision in 2002. Two years later, a renormalization of the percentile scoring system was performed to ensure that a 50 percent score represented performing better than 50 percent of all test takers. The 10-section ASVAB improves the matching of volunteers with available jobs and helps match job openings with qualified individuals.
In addition to the MGIB, there may be additional funds available from the College Fund and Veterans' Educational Assistance Program (VEAP) "kicker". If you are receiving Tuition Assistance (TA) from your branch of service, you may be eligible to use MGIB to supplement or "top up" your tuition assistance. Benefits end 10 years from the date of your last discharge or release from active duty. You may be able to transfer your MGIB entitlement to basic educational assistance to one or more of your dependents, including your spouse and/or children. To apply, file VA Form 22-1990, Application for Education Benefits. For more information, call 1-888-GIBILL-1 (1-888-442-4551) or visit the GI Bill Education Benefits web site.
The Word Knowledge section of the test gauges your ability to recognize the meaning of words both individually and when used in a sentence. A question may be phrased as, “‘Antagonize’ most nearly means: embarrass, struggle, provoke, or worship.” Because there are so many words in the English language, you may find it difficult to study the specific words on the test. However, striving to improve your language and vocabulary usage with a practice test like this one can help you not only in preparing for the ASVAB test but also in your career and personal life. The CAT-ASVAB test has 16 questions in 8 minutes, while the paper-and-pencil version has 35 questions in 11 minutes.
Word Knowledge (WK), Paragraph Comprehension (PC), Arithmetic Reasoning (AR), and Mathematics Knowledge (MK). Scores on the AFQT are used to determine your eligibility for enlistment in the Army, Navy, Air Force, or Marine Corps. The other six test scores on the ASVAB tests are used to determine the best job for you in the military as your grades will demonstrate knowledge, skill, and interest in certain subjects and tasks. 
The Electronics Information section of the practice test gauges your knowledge of electrical equipment and parts, including circuits, currents, batteries, and resistors. An example may be, “Because solid state diodes have no filament, they: don’t work, are less efficient than tubes, require less operating power, or require more operating power?” The CAT-ASVAB has 16 questions in 8 minutes; the paper-and-pencil version has 20 questions in 9 minutes.
These relationships are seen from the perspective of political-military relations, the military-industrial complex mentioned above, and the socio-military relationship. The last can be divided between those segments of society that offer support for the military, those who voice opposition to the military, the voluntary and involuntary civilians in the military forces, the populations of civilians in a combat zone, and of course the military's self-perception.

In broad usage, the terms "armed forces" and "military" are often treated as synonymous, although in technical usage a distinction is sometimes made in which a country's armed forces may include both its military and other paramilitary forces. Armed force is the use of armed forces to achieve political objectives. There are various forms of irregular military forces, not belonging to a recognized state; though they share many attributes with regular military forces, they are less often referred to as simply "military".
In the 1950s, the military adopted a single exam known as the Armed Forces Qualification Test (AFQT). Used as a screening tool, the AFQT measured a recruit’s ability to absorb military training and their future potential. It was supplemented by service-specific battery tests for the purposes of MOS classification. In 1972, the Department of Defense determined that all services should use one exam for screening and assigning individuals to an MOS. The AFQT was phased out over a two-year period in favor of the current Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB) test.
The majority of people who complete the exam have little intention of entering the military. However, it’s important to keep in mind that the United States military is actually one of the nation’s largest employers. If you’re undecided about your future after high school graduation, taking the test can give you a better picture of your options in both civilian and military life.
Educational Opportunities–More educational opportunities are available than ever before.  Alternatives to traditional education, such as online courses and weekend or evening programs, allow individuals to obtain higher education while working full-time.  New technology, such as live podcasts and streaming videos on demand, make it possible for people to learn at their own pace in their own place.  Education is a lifelong process.  Many people now choose to combine their education with work experience.  For instance, instead of attending a four-year college immediately after high school, some people get a two-year degree in a particular field and then enter the job force.  At some point, they may choose to complete a certificate program or a four-year degree to advance in their chosen field.  Other people choose to enter the Military to take advantage of the educational benefits and training that is provided.  There are a variety of occupations and career paths that you can pursue with different levels of education.  Do not rule out a given career field simply because you think that the educational requirements might be more than what you would like to pursue after high school.
If school district or open-enrollment charter school has entered into a prior contract under which a vocational aptitude test that does not comply with the requirements for an alternative test outlined above, then the school district, open-enrollment charter school, or high school may elect not to provide the ASVAB for the term of the contract. On the expiration of the contract term, the requirements outlined in this letter become applicable to the school district, open-enrollment charter school or high school.
The content of the test has been clearly laid out, but there is still a ton of information concerning the actual place where the test is administered and the time that is allocated for each section. The computerized test is administered in a “military entrance processing station” (MEP) or a satellite region that is identified as a “military entrance tests site” (MET). The difference in the two locations is that the METs are the places that are responsible for administering the written test, while MEPs are the places that administer the computerized tests.
×