The Armed Forces Qualifying Test, commonly known as the AFQT, is used by the United States military to assess prospective service members. The questions on this test are taken from the Armed Forces Vocational Aptitude Battery. The following ASVAB subject areas are included in the test: arithmetical reasoning (AR), mathematics knowledge (MK), verbal expression (VE), paragraph comprehension (PC), and word knowledge (WK). These are the most general academic content areas on the ASVAB. The formula for computing scores on the AFQT test is AR + MK + (2 x VE), with VE = PC + MK. Scores are then placed in the following categories: Category I (93 to 99), Category II (65 to 92), Category IIIA (50 to 64), Category IIIB (31 to 49), Category IVA (21 to 30), Category IVB (16 to 20), Category IVC (10 to 15), and Category V (0 to 9). These AFQT test score categories are percentiles, which indicate how well the test-taker performed relative to others. A person scoring a 50, for example, performed as well as or better than half of the other test-takers. The percentile score is based on the raw score (number of questions answered correctly) and the difficulty of the test version. The minimum passing score for the AFQT varies between branches of the military.
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Law prohibits applicants in Category V from enlisting.[6] In addition, there are constraints placed on Category IV recruits; recruits in Category IV must be high school diploma graduates but cannot be denied enlistment solely on this criteria if the recruit is needed to satisfy established strength requirements. Furthermore, the law constrains the percentage of accessions who can fall between Categories IV-V (currently, the limit is 20% of all persons originally enlisted in a given armed force in a given fiscal year).[6]
As of 31 December 2010, U.S. Armed Forces troops were stationed in 150 countries; the number of non-contingent deployments per country ranges from 1 in Suriname to over 50,000 in Germany.[30] Some of the largest deployments are: 103,700 in Afghanistan, 52,440 in Germany (see list), 35,688 in Japan (USFJ), 28,500 in South Korea (USFK), 9,660 in Italy and 9,015 in the United Kingdom. These numbers change frequently due to the regular recall and deployment of units.
A military or an armed force is a professional organization formally authorized by a sovereign state to use lethal or deadly force and weapons to support the interests of the state. It typically consists of branches such as an Army, Navy, Air Force, and in certain countries the Marines and Coast Guard. The task of the military is usually defined as defense of the state, and its citizens, and the prosecution of war against another state. The military may also have additional sanctioned and non-sanctioned functions within a society, including, the promotion of a political agenda, protecting corporate economic interests, internal population control, construction, emergency services, social ceremonies, and guarding important areas. The military may also function as a discrete subculture within a larger civil society, through the development of separate infrastructures, which may include housing, schools, utilities, logistics, health and medical, law, food production, finance and banking.
Each of the five services employs a single Senior Enlisted Advisor at departmental level. This individual is the highest ranking enlisted member within that respective service and functions as the chief advisor to the service secretary, service chief and Congress on matters concerning the enlisted force. These individuals carry responsibilities and protocol requirements equivalent to three-star general or flag officers. They are as follows:
At this point, it should be clear that an ASVAB practice test is required. The next decision is regarding the people that should be trusted to provide the test. Well, that is undoubtedly the nation's practice tests. They have a team of men and women that thoroughly analyze all areas that are covered on the ASVAB test. In addition to that, those men and women examine previous test questions and implement those so that the user of the tests is provided with the most precise questions. Lastly, one can say based on the unequivocal evidence that individuals that prepare with these ASVAB practice tests excel.
The ASVAB is a series of timed aptitude tests that are used to classify selected candidates into appropriate job roles as well as ultimately decide the eligibility of candidates for US military service.  In other words, perform poorly on this test and you could severely limit your opportunities in the military or even prevent yourself from serving.

As of 2017, the U.S. spends about US$610 billion annually to fund its military forces and Overseas Contingency Operations.[6] Put together, the U.S. constitutes roughly 40 percent of the world's military expenditures. The U.S. Armed Forces has significant capabilities in both defense and power projection due to its large budget, resulting in advanced and powerful technologies which enables a widespread deployment of the force around the world, including around 800 military bases outside the United States.[12] The U.S. Air Force is the world's largest air force, the U.S. Navy is the world's largest navy by tonnage, and the U.S. Navy and the U.S. Marine Corps combined are the world's second largest air arm. In terms of size, the U.S. Coast Guard is the world's 12th largest naval force.[13] [14][15]


This advice, though well-intentioned, doesn’t address the needs of some new recruits who are interested in specific career fields but are worried about their test performance-especially in areas related to math comprehension. Potential recruits who feel deficient in math, language, or science skills should have a frank conversation with their recruiter to discuss possible refresher study or even supplemental classes in any self-perceived “problem areas” before taking the test.
These are sections, or sub-tests, in the ASVAB:  Word Knowledge (WK), Paragraph Comprehension (PC), Arithmetic Reasoning (AR), Mathematics Knowledge (MK), General Science (GS), Mechanical Comprehension (MC), Electronics Information (EI), and Assembling Objects (AO), Auto & Shop Information (AS):  * AI and SI are administered as separate tests in the CAT-ASVAB (computerized version), but combined into one single score (labeled AS).
Additionally, many ASVAB practice tests have a section explaining the answer choices. It can be tempting to read the explanation and think that you now have a good understanding of the concept. However, an explanation likely only covers part of the question’s broader context. Even if the explanation makes sense, go back and investigate every concept related to the question until you’re positive you have a thorough understanding.

Tests are administered at participating schools. Neither schools nor students incur any costs for taking the ASVAB or using the Career Exploration Program. A test administrator is provided for every testing session and that person has no additional recruitment responsibilities. Various accommodations are available for the ASVAB, such as having questions read aloud, providing extra time, and other accommodations. School staff members are responsible, however, for tests that are administered with accommodations because test administrators are only able to administer the ASVAB by following the standardized procedure. If the test is being used for enlisting, only scores obtained during standardized test sessions (with no accommodations) can be used.
What you'll learn: Cell biology, division and operations; genetics; evolution; plant and animal biology; nutrition; human anatomy and physiology; ecology; matter, atomic structure, the periodic table, and chemical reactions; measurement; nuclear chemistry; motion, force, energy, and work; fluids; waves and sound; and geology, meteorology, oceanography, and astronomy
Doing poorly on the ASVAB might mean missing out on the military job that you really want- and maybe not getting in the military at all. If you’re stressed about taking the ASVAB, don’t worry- we’ve got you covered! Our free study guides for the ASVAB will give you an overview of the concepts you need to know and will help you pinpoint the areas you should spend your time studying. From Arithmetic Reasoning to Word Knowledge and every subject in between, our study guides for the ASVAB will help you get the ASVAB score that you need!
Direct commission: civilians who have special skills that are critical to sustaining military operations and supporting troops may receive direct commissions. These officers occupy leadership positions in law, medicine, dentistry, pharmacy, intelligence, supply-logistics-transportation, engineering, public affairs, chaplain, oceanography and others.
PiCAT testing does require a shorter “verification test” for new recruits. This is in the form of a short, proctored test that lasts about a half an hour. Depending on circumstances, recruits may be required to take this verification test at a Military Entrance Processing Station, or within 30 days of taking PiCAT if the recruit is not going to MEPS right away. Those who do not pass the verification test will be required to take the ASVAB.

The last requirement of the military is for military performance assessment, and learning from it. These two functions are performed by military historians and military theorists who seek to identify failures and success of the armed force, and integrate corrections into the military reform, with the aim of producing an improved force capable of performing adequately, should there be a national defence policy review.

The test is part of the larger ASVAB Career Exploration Program. The Program uses the test to help students identify both their interests as well as their strengths in three skills areas (verbal, math, and science and technical skills). Based on a student's skill levels, information is provided about more than 400 occupations in order to enable students and parents to judge their potential success in areas that interest them the most. Schools that may be facing budget cuts or finding themselves with limited resources devoted to career counseling are encouraged to find out whether using the ASVAB Program would be useful, as the testing and career development services are free of charge.

Battlefield commission: under certain conditions, enlisted personnel who have skills that separate them from their peers can become officers by direct commissioning of a commander so authorized to grant them. This type of commission is rarely granted and is reserved only for the most exceptional enlisted personnel; it is done on an ad hoc basis, typically only in wartime. No direct battlefield commissions have been awarded since the Vietnam War. The Navy and Air Force do not employ this commissioning path.


Later this became known as military science, and later still, would adopt the scientific method approach to the conduct of military operations under the influence of the Industrial Revolution thinking. In his seminal book On War, the Prussian Major-General and leading expert on modern military strategy, Carl von Clausewitz defined military strategy as 'the employment of battles to gain the end of war'.[36] According to Clausewitz:
The Air Force ASVAB scores are frequently a subject of confusion and anxiety for the person planning a career in the Air Force. The real meaning of ASVAB scores as they apply to each person's future in this branch of the military is rarely explained fully . There are some unfortunate misapprehensions about what the scores mean and how they affect a person's occupational prospects in the Air Force.
The ASVAB is a series of timed aptitude tests that are used to classify selected candidates into appropriate job roles as well as ultimately decide the eligibility of candidates for US military service.  In other words, perform poorly on this test and you could severely limit your opportunities in the military or even prevent yourself from serving.
The Student ASVAB is the most flexible of the exams. It is typically provided to high school students to help them assess their skills, job prospects, potential military positions, or college majors. The ASVAB for students is essentially the same as the MET ASVAB exam, only students are not necessarily testing for positions within the military. The students’ school counselors examine their scores and help them decide on what to do after graduating from high school. This test is still an important component of a student’s education because it can help them identify their strengths and weaknesses and help set them on the right track for their future career goals.
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